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Internet users browse online in Hong Kong. Photo: Kin Cheung / AP

Your Wi-Fi may no longer be as secure as you thought. Researchers Monday morning revealed a breach that takes advantage of Wi-Fi vulnerabilities to allow hackers to see traffic between computers and wireless hubs, notably in the popular WPA2 security scheme, ArsTechnica reports. The hacker must be close to the Wi-Fi network to execute the hack, per IBTimes.

Why it matters: The WEP scheme has previously been hacked, and this is another reminder that Wi-Fi isn't always going to be secure. As Lee Munson, Security Researcher at Comparitech.com emails, "The WPA2 encryption algorithm, which was thought to be rock solid, is so widespread in its use that its cracking potentially puts everyone at risk."

  • Precautions to take: "Users are advised to look out for the padlock symbol in their browser, or the addition of the letter 's' on the end of the http part of a web address, before sharing personal or financial information," Munson said. ArsTechnica's Dan Goodin writes, "people should avoid using Wi-Fi whenever possible until a patch or mitigation is in place…As a fall-back users should consider using a virtual private network as an added safety measure."
  • How it's happening: There's a four-way handshake that establishes a key for securing traffic, but the third step allows the key to be resent multiple times, which allows encryption to be undermined, according to a researcher briefed on the vulnerability. The researchers, the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team and KU Leuven, report this breach, called KRACK (Key Reinstallation Attacks) could allow connection hijacking and malicious code injection.

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New or expanded climate initiatives are popping up at several universities, a sign of the topic's rising prominence and recognition of the threats and opportunities it creates.

Why it matters: Climate and clean energy initiatives at colleges and universities are nothing new, but it shows expanded an campus focus as the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent, and the world is nowhere near the steep emissions cuts that scientists say are needed to hold future warming in check.

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The pandemic isn't slowing tech

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Thursday's deluge of Big Tech earnings reports showed one thing pretty clearly: COVID-19 may be bad in all sorts of ways, but it's not slowing down the largest tech companies. If anything, it's helping some companies, like Amazon and Apple.

Yes, but: With the pandemic once again worsening in the U.S. and Europe, it's not clear how long the tech industry's winning streak can last.

Texas early voting surpasses 2016's total turnout

Early voting in Austin earlier this month. Photo: Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Texas' early and mail-in voting totals for the 2020 election have surpassed the state's total voter turnout in 2016, with 9,009,850 ballots already cast compared to 8,969,226 in the last presidential cycle.

Why it matters: The state's 38 Electoral College votes are in play — and could deliver a knockout blow for Joe Biden over President Trump — despite the fact that it hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976.