Stories

Why the "Charging Bull" is firing back at the "Fearless Girl"

Bebeto Matthews / AP

Italian-born sculptor Arturo Di Modica erected the "Charging Bull" statue in 1987 without a permit, in the middle of the night, outside the New York Stock Exchange, as a symbol of American resilience after the stock market crash. Authorities removed it, only to reinstall it because of its popularity with the public.

On the morning of International Women's Day last month, Wall Street woke up to the "Fearless Girl" staring down the bull, symbolizing female empowerment. It was commissioned by State Street Global Advisors, a mutual fund company that tracks gender diversity.

"Fearless Girl" was granted an extended stay from Mayor Bill de Blasio after increased popularity.

Now, the "Charging Bull" artist is suing State Street Global Advisors, for copyright and trademark infringment, arguing that the "Fearless Girl" changes the meaning of the bull and takes away from his artistic vision.

Mayor de Blasio missed the mark, and misrepresented Di Modica's argument in a tweet yesterday saying, "Men who don't like women taking up space are exactly why we need the Fearless Girl."