Sep 14, 2017

Why some employees critical of Uber are staying

Eric Risberg / AP

Since Uber's avalanche of explosive allegations and controversies began earlier this year, one of the biggest questions has been: Why aren't more employees running out the door? Some executives and employees have certainly left, but many remain and continue to root for Uber's success.

Follow the money: For some employees, especially those who joined early enough, there's huge financial upside. And, until recently, walking away would have likely meant forfeiting equity.

  • "How do you ask people to easily give up 95% of their potential wealth and retirement?" an investor (not in Uber) recently asked.
  • Some employees who have chosen to stick around, despite being deeply critical of Uber's leadership, nevertheless would prefer to see their years of hard work ultimately pay out, two tell Axios.

Renewed hope: Uber's new CEO also changes the math. While over a thousand employees petitioned for ex-CEO Travis Kalanick's return after he was forced to resign in June, many were glad to see him go. New boss Dara Khosrowshahi has said that he foresees an IPO in 18 to 24 months, giving clearer expectations than Kalanick's preference for delaying the event.

Other reasons:

One young female engineer has told Axios that she genuinely enjoys working with her team and her current projects, which she finds meaningful, despite the toxic culture that past leadership enabled.

Go deeper

Black Americans' competing crises

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

For many black Americans, this moment feels like a crisis within a crisis within a crisis.

The big picture: It's not just George Floyd's killing by police. Or the deaths of EMT Breonna Taylor and jogger Ahmaud Arbery. Or the demeaning of birdwatcher Christian Cooper and journalist Omar Jimenez. Or the coronavirus pandemic's disproportionate harm to African Americans. It's that it's all happening at once.

Amnesty International: U.S. police must end militarized response to protests

Washington State Police use tear gas to disperse a crowd in Seattle during a demonstration protesting the death of George Floyd. Photo: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Amnesty International issued a statement on Sunday morning calling for an end to militarized policing in several U.S. cities and the use of "excessive force" against demonstrators protesting police brutality.

Why it matters: The human rights group said police across the country were "failing their obligations under international law to respect and facilitate the right to peaceful protest, exacerbating a tense situation and endangering the lives of protesters."

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Coronavirus looms over George Floyd protests across the country

Protestors rally in Minneapolis. Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Health experts fear that massive protests against police brutality in major cities around the United States could result in new coronavirus outbreaks due to the close proximity of demonstrators, AP reports.

Why it matters: The U.S. has already recorded more confirmed coronavirus cases and deaths than any other country in the world. A potential surge in cases stemming from the protests would come as many states are weeks into their phased reopening plans.