Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo Illustration: Axios Visuals

Cloudflare's network powers internet connections to millions of websites, but most of the 2.8 billion people who use its network every month have never heard of the company. That is, until last August, when Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince made the controversial decision to cut off its service to white supremacist website “The Daily Stormer" in the aftermath of the Charlottesville violence, causing the site to go down.

Why it matters: Prince, the son of a journalist and an avid defender of free speech, took heat from some for acting as an internet gatekeeper and was praised by others for taking down neo-Nazi content. His decision fed into the larger debate over whether powerful internet players should have editorial control over how content is distributed online.

What's next: The next turning point in that debate comes on Thursday, when FCC Chairman Ajit Pai leads the vote that will erase net neutrality rules from the books.

We caught up with Prince after he'd met with Pai on the topic of internet freedom. Below are excerpts, edited for length and clarity.

Q. You were opposed to the FCC's passage of net neutrality rules using Title II in 2015, but now you are opposed to rolling them back. Why?

The absence of regulation in a space that had been relatively unregulated is different than withdrawing regulation. And the chess board has changed since then (with more ISPs trying to bundle content). If you own the pipes and the content, there's even more incentive to prioritize your content over rival's content, which creates even more risk.

That said, I think the transparency requirements of Pai's proposal are important, forcing ISPs to publicly disclose if there's throttling, blocking or fast lanes. The net neutralty lobby is strong. There will be normative pressure on these companies to discourage that behavior.

I think that the interest group that is most at risk in all of these conversations is the startup that hasn't started yet. And unfortunately that's the group that least well represented.

Q. What's your reaction to Pai's remarks that edge providers like Google and Facebook are more of a threat to the open internet than ISPs?

I don't disagree and, in fact, he quoted a blog post I'd written about how there is real risk in anyone who is in the position of gatekeeper at them exercising some editorial control over what content should or should not be accessible online, or the rate at which it is accessible or how it is prioritized or preferred. The only threat to accessing content on the internet is not ISPs.

But just because there are other threats online to restricting content doesn't mean “let's create more." Which is what the risk is here. If a company like Cloudflare with 500 employees and market cap two orders of magnitude smaller than Comcast poses a threat, then even larger companies that have a monopoly over the eyeballs and access the internet also pose a threat.

Q. What is Cloudflare's role in that?

2.8 billion people use our network every month. 99.999 percent of them have no idea they're using it. That lack of visibility and as a result the lack of effective transparency, I think, is actually is concerning if we start making editorial judgement of what content can and can't be online… Our job is to move bytes, not to pick winners.

Q. How does that square with your decision to allow Daily Stormer to be taken down? Would you make that same decision again?

If we had a time machine, yes, I'd go back and do it again. We needed to provoke the conversation about what the right role was. We needed to meet with the FCC about this and to talk through this and to get people to say, there might be some difference between Facebook and Google and Twitter and Cloudflare and AT&T. There is unlikely to be one rule that applies in all of these cases. We need a framework to think [through] that.

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - World

North Korea fires short-range missile to sea, slams "hostile" U.S. policy

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. Photo: API/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said Tuesday that North Korea's military had fired a short-range missile toward its eastern sea, per AP.

Why it matters: North Korea's ambassador to the United Nations defended the latest launch in remarks to the UN General Assembly, demanding the U.S. and South Korea end their "hostile policy" against the country.

Arizona Judge: Adding mask mandates ban to budget bill is unconstitutional

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey (R) Photo: Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

An Arizona judge ruled Monday that the state's ban on mask mandates in schools, and other measures put into the state budget by Republicans, are unconstitutional, the Arizona Republic reports.

Why it matters: The sweeping ruling voids a ban on vaccine requirements for public universities, community colleges and local governments, and strikes down some non-COVID-related measures like a ban on teaching critical race theory in classrooms and anti-fraud measures for ballots.

Activision to set up $18M victims fund in response to harassment suit

Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Activision Blizzard announced plans Monday to settle a sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuit from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission hours after it was filed.

Why it matters: This is Activision's most visible acknowledgment of problems at the company, in the wake of a series of workplace misconduct lawsuits, complaints and investigations initiated against the "Call of Duty" and "World of Warcraft" maker since the summer.