Feb 12, 2020 - Politics & Policy

White supremacist propaganda in U.S. jumped 120% from 2018 to 2019

A marcher during New York City's No Hate No Fear Jewish Solidarity March on Jan. 1, 2020. Photo: Ira L. Black/Corbis/Getty Images

Incidents of white supremacist propaganda distributed across the U.S. jumped more than 120% from 2018 to 2019, the Anti-Defamation League found, per the AP.

The big picture: Oren Segal, director of the group's Center on Extremism told the AP that there has been greater use of more subtly biased rhetoric — including a focus on "patriotism" — "to make their hate more palatable for a 2020 audience."

  • 2019 is the second straight year to see the circulation of such propaganda material more than double.

The state of play: The group reported 2,713 cases of circulated propaganda from white supremacist groups in 2019 across 49 states. The circulation of the propaganda occurred most often in these 10 states:

  • California
  • Texas
  • New York
  • Massachusetts
  • New Jersey
  • Ohio
  • Virginia
  • Kentucky
  • Washington
  • Florida

Two-thirds of the propaganda was traced back to the group Patriot Front, which the ADL describes as "formed by disaffected members" of the white supremacist organization Vanguard America.

Go deeper: Hate crimes reach 16-year high according to FBI report

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The demographic shifts disrupting the political world

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images, Banaras Khan/AFP via Getty Images, and Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

America's identity is nearing a tipping point as demographics change, which helps explain why so many 2020 presidential candidates are testing the conventional wisdom about who can win elections.

The big picture: The irony is that the biggest changes haven't been reflected in the kinds of candidates leading the 2020 polls — most of whom are white, rich men. But they could have a big impact on the final outcome.

Accused El Paso Walmart shooter faces federal hate crime charges

Memorial at the Walmart in El Paso. Photo: Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

The suspect accused of killing 22 people and injuring two dozen others at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, last August has been charged with 90 counts under federal hate crime and firearms laws, AP reports, citing an indictment unsealed on Thursday.

Why it matters: Investigators found that 21-year-old Patrick Crusius, who confessed but entered a not guilty plea on a state capital murder charge last October, posted a manifesto aimed at scaring Hispanics into leaving the United States. The hate crime charges carry a possible death penalty.

Go deeper: The deadliest mass shootings in modern U.S. history

Report: Sanders says he was briefed on Russia trying to help his campaign

Bernie Sanders at a press conference in Santa Ana, California on Feb. 21. Photo: Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders told reporters at a campaign stop Friday that he was briefed by U.S. officials "about a month ago" on Russia's attempts to assist his 2020 presidential campaign, AP reports. "It was not clear what role they were going to play," he added.

Driving the news: Sanders' comments followed a Washington Post report that U.S. officials briefed Sanders on Russian efforts to help his 2020 campaign "as part of an effort to interfere with the Democratic contest."

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 21, 2020 - Politics & Policy