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White House: Trump "hasn't backed away from" raising gun purchase age

Sanders at the podium. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said President Trump "hasn't back away from" some of the school safety proposals he initially made, such as raising the purchase age for certain weapons, though his plan — unveiled yesterday — excludes such actions opposed by the NRA.

"Is there anything [in Trump's school safety plan] that the NRA opposes?," ABC's Jon Karl asked. Sanders said that increasing the age to purchase assault-style rifles to 21 "will be reviewed."


  • On the attack against an ex-spy in the U.K., which British PM Theresa May said was "likely" perpetrated by Russians: "Outrage ... reckless ... irresponsible ... We stand by our closest ally in the special relationship we have... We are ready if we can be of any assistance." Notable: Sanders didn't say "Russia."
  • Trump will make his first trip to Latin America, with a stop in Lima, Peru, next month.
  • White House "fully expects" the meeting between Trump and Kim Jong-un will happen. “North Korea made several promises and we hope they stick to those promises and if so, the meeting will go on as planned," Sanders said.
Erica Pandey 1 hour ago
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How China became a powerhouse of espionage

Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

As China’s influence spreads to every corner of the globe under President Xi Jinping, so do its spies.

Why it matters: China has the money and the ambition to build a vast foreign intelligence network, including inside the United States. Meanwhile, American intelligence-gathering on China is falling short, Chris Johnson, a former senior China analyst for the CIA who's now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, tells Axios: "We have to at least live up to [China's] expectations. And we aren't doing that."

Caitlin Owens 1 hour ago
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Congress doesn't love the spending bill, but it passed anyway

Congressional leaders
Speaker Paul Ryan, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. (Photo: Matt McClain / The Washington Post via Getty Images)

House Speaker Paul Ryan touted the defense spending increase, Sen. Rand Paul angrily tweeted about arcane government spending, and Democrats shook their head at the lack of gun control measures. But most members of Congress accepted the omnibus spending bill for what it is: A giant collection of what has to get done to keep the government functioning, while mustering enough votes to pass.

Why it matters: This is a $1.3 trillion dollar bill affecting every branch of government that passed mostly because it had to. Members voted on it without really reading it, as it was released Wednesday night and passed the Senate shortly after midnight Friday.