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Shah: White House won't "agree with the NRA on every single issue"

Raj Shah.
Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

When Principal Deputy Press Secretary Raj Shah was asked Thursday if President Trump was considering a semiautomatic weapons ban, Shah reiterated that "no off the table." But, he did make clear that Trump does not support a ban on assault weapons, as he expressed during his campaign.

The backdrop: President Trump has doubled down on potentially raising the minimum age to buy weapons and arming teachers or other personnel in schools to deter attackers. The issue of raising changing the minimum age in particular has been criticized by the NRA, but Shah said the White House doesn't "expect to agree with the NRA on every single issue."

  • When asked if Trump was willing to stand against the NRA, Shah said he is "willing to do what's right to ensure we have safe schools."
  • On Syria: "The Assad regime and Russia's actions on this front are on notice."
  • On the Schiff memo: "Once it meets the FBI's standards for ensuring that law enforcement, sensitive sources and methods are protected, we would support its release."

One more thing: Kevin Hassett, Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers, spoke to the press about the annual Economic Report of the President. He said "cyber theft is costing us about $100 billion a year," and the opioid crisis is costing $500 billion.

Jonathan Swan 15 hours ago
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A stunning leak rattles Trump and his aides

President Trump discussed his call with Russian President Vladimir Putin during an Oval Office meeting with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Photo: Kevin Dietsch, Pool / Getty Images

One of the most startling leaks — and stunning revelations — of this whole administration has left President Trump and his senior staff furious and rattled. The Washington Post reports in its lead story: "Trump did not follow specific warnings from his national security advisers [yesterday] when he congratulated ... Putin on his reelection — including a section in his briefing materials in all-capital letters stating 'DO NOT CONGRATULATE.'"

Why it matters: The speed and sensitivity of the leak prompted immediate finger-pointing within the administration, as aides reeled from a leak that could only have come from a small group of people, each of whom is trusted with sensitive national secrets.

Mike Allen 15 hours ago
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Scoop: Zuckerberg finally plans to speak

Mark Zuckerberg in 2016. Photo: Lluis Gene / AFP / Getty Images

Axios is told that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg plans to speak out in the next 24 hours on the data-harvesting revelations that have hammered his stock price, inflamed lawmakers in D.C. and Europe, and trapped his social network in a crisis of trust.

Quote"It’s a big deal, and he knows it."
— A source close to Zuckerberg

What's been happening: We're told that Zuckerberg was initially more focused on how to fix the problems than on what to say. But that left a vacuum that provoked merciless coverage, increased lawmakers' suspicions, and even left some employees demoralized.