"The After Party," by NBC News, MSNBC and Comcast NBCUniversal, at the Italian Embassy. Photo: NBC News.

Last night, the political world had something for everyone.

Driving the news: President Trump traded out the White House Correspondents' Association dinner for a rally in Green Bay, while the Clintons and former President Obama appeared at non-WHCA speaking engagements in Washington.

  • The White House Correspondents' Association dinner was boycotted by President Trump, who made administration guests cancel at the last minute. In an effort by the association to make the dinner less Hollywood-y and more of a celebration of the First Amendment, the evening concluded with a historian rather than an entertainer. "Alexander Hamilton" author Ron Chernow drew applause when he said presidents have always had differences with the press, but that "they don't need to be steeped in venom."
  • President Trump counter-programmed with a rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin, laced with shots at the press. Sarah Sanders strode onstage to chants of "Sarah! Sarah! Sarah!" and said in an allusion to the WHCA dinner: "Last year this night I was at a slightly different event. ... Not quite the best welcome." (NY Times)
  • Less than three miles from the WHCA dinner — at the National Museum of African American History, at a gala that's part of a year-long celebration of the centennial of Nelson Mandela's birth — President Obama spoke about the power of young people to carry forward the legacy of South Africa's liberator.
  • And less than a mile from Obama, Bill and Hillary Clinton spoke at DAR Constitution Hall as part of their arena tour, which has drawn 15,000 so far.

Video: Comedy Central's Jordan Klepper made this video ("Hillary Clinton Reads the Mueller Report") as a setup to last night's appearance by the Clintons.

Go deeper

Jeff Sessions loses Alabama Senate primary runoff

Jeff Sessions. Photo: Michael DeMocker/Getty Images

Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions has lost the Republican nomination for Senate to Tommy Tuberville in Alabama in Tuesday night’s primary runoff, AP reports.

Why it matters: Sessions had been the underdog in the race against former Auburn University head football coach Tommy Tuberville, who had the backing of President Trump. Tuberville will now face off against Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) in November, who is considered to have one of the most vulnerable Democratic Senate seats in the country.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 13,273,537 — Total deaths: 577,006 — Total recoveries — 7,367,106Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 3,424,304 — Total deaths: 136,432 — Total recoveries: 1,049,098 — Total tested: 41,764,557Map.
  3. Politics: Biden welcomes Trump wearing mask in public but warns "it’s not enough"
  4. Public health: Four former CDC heads say Trump's undermining of agency puts lives at risk — CDC director: U.S. could get coronavirus "under control" in 4–8 weeks if all wear masks.

Bank CEOs brace for worsening economic scenario

JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon. Photo: J. Lawler Duggan/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

Wells Fargo swung to its first loss since the financial crisis — while JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup reported significantly lower profits from a year earlier — as the banks set aside billions of dollars more in the second quarter for loans that may go bad.

Why it matters: The cumulative $28 billion in loan loss provisions that banks have so far announced they’re reserving serves as a signal they’re preparing for a colossal wave of loan defaults as the economy slogs through a coronavirus-driven downturn.