Jun 26, 2017

White House bashes CBO over health care score

AP

The White House has issued a statement slamming the Congressional Budget Office over its estimate that 22 million more people would be uninsured under the Senate health care plan:

"The CBO has consistently proven it cannot accurately predict how healthcare legislation will impact insurance coverage. This history of inaccuracy, as demonstrated by its flawed report on coverage, premiums, and predicted deficit arising out of Obamacare, reminds us that its analysis must not be trusted blindly."

Trump wants Republicans to push ahead, and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has signaled he will do so, but the score is fueling resistance in the Senate.

Republicans

McConnell: "The American people deserve #Bettercare, which is exactly what we're working to bring them.... #Bettercare reduces premiums, deficit, & middle class taxes."

Sen. Ted Cruz, a conservative holdout: "At this point, we need to do considerably more to lower premiums."

Sen Ron Johnson, another holdout, said it would be a "mistake" to rush to a vote.

Sen. Mike Enzi, chairman of the Budget Committee, stressed the positives, saying the CBO determined "the draft bill would lower premiums by 30 percent when compared with current law, while also lowering taxes for hardworking families and providing more than $331 billion in on-budget deficit reduction."

Sen. John Cornyn, in a statement: "Our plan will help address Obamacare's ballooning costs for consumers by lowering premiums over time and cutting taxes, and today's estimate confirms that."

Sen. Susan Collins tweeted "I will vote no" because she wanted the Senate bill to fix the flaws of ACA but the CBO score shows it won't.

Democrats

Sen. Brian Schatz: "CBO confirms this thing is a %#$@ sandwich."

Sen. Bernie Sanders: "The CBO analysis of the disastrous Trump-McConnell health care bill gives us 22 million reasons why it should not see the light of day."

Sen. Tim Kaine: "3rd CBO score on a #Trumpcare bill, 3rd horrifying result."

Go deeper

Updated 28 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Updates: George Floyd protests continue for 8th day

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day, prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: The National Park Service said in a statement Tuesday that while it "is committed to the peaceful expression of First Amendment rights," it "cannot tolerate violence to citizens or officers or damage to our nation’s resources that we are entrusted to protect."

American carnage

Protesters race up a hill to avoid tear gas in Philadelphia, June 1. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The list of victims has swiftly grown since George Floyd died in police custody just eight days ago.

The big picture: Protests against police brutality have turned into a showcase of police brutality, with tear gas and rubber bullets deployed against crowds. The police have the arsenals at their disposal, but we're also seeing law enforcement officers becoming targets.

McConnell blocks resolution condemning Trump's actions against peaceful protesters

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) blocked a resolution introduced by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday that would have condemned the use of tear gas and rubber bullets against peaceful protesters outside the White House on Monday in order to allow President Trump to walk to St. John's Church.

What they're saying: "Justice for black Americans in the face of unjust violence, and peace for our country in the face of looting, riots, and domestic terror. Those are the two issues Americans want addressed," McConnell said on the Senate floor.