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Students protesting at a rally on Capitol Hill in March. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Survivors of the Parkland, Florida school shooting have joined a group of Americans in pressuring federal lawmakers to rethink their positions on gun control after one of the country's deadliest school massacres in modern history. But the nonresponse from most members of Congress, as seen in the Washington Post's extensive outreach to every member, sheds light on why legislative efforts on gun control is dragging slowly.

By the numbers, per the Post:

  • Of 237 House Republicans, 29 responded to repeated attempts; 35 of the 193 Democrats did not respond.
  • 153 Democrats and two Republicans said they support the Parkland agenda.

What they're asking for:

  • Funding for the CDC to conduct gun violence research.
  • Give the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives more control over tracking and recording gun sales.
  • Universal background check for all gun sales, including online and at gun shows.
  • Prohibiting magazines that hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition.
  • Ban assault weapons, including a registration or buyback program for these weapons already in circulation.

The backdrop: Democrats and liberal-leaning groups have been using gun control as a key campaign issue to energize and register young voters in traditional battleground states ahead of this year's midterm election. The New York Times reports that key states have seen a spike in new voter registrations among young people.

  • In North Carolina, for example, the Times reports that voter data shows around 30% of new registrations in January and February are voters under 25. They were around 40% in March and April.

Go deeper with the Washington Post's analysis; Where Americans agree and disagree on gun control

Go deeper

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Iran's nuclear dilemma: Ramp up now or wait for Biden

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The world is waiting to see whether Iran will strike back at Israel or the U.S. over the assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the architect of Iran's military nuclear program.

Why it matters: Senior Iranian officials have stressed that Iran will take revenge against the perpetrators, but also respond by continuing Fakhrizadeh’s legacy — the nuclear program. The key question is whether Iran will accelerate that work now, or wait to see what President-elect Biden puts on the table.

Updated 1 hour ago - Health

U.K. first nation to clear Pfizer coronavirus vaccine for mass rollout

A health care worker during the phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trial by Pfizer and BioNTech in Ankara, Turkey, in October. Photo: Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The United Kingdom's government announced Wednesday it's approved Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine, which "will be made available across the U.K. from next week."

Why it matters: The U.K. has beaten the U.S. to become the first Western country to give emergency approval for a vaccine that's found to be 95% effective with no serious side effects against a virus that's killed nearly 1.5 million people globally.

3 hours ago - World

Biden says he won't immediately remove U.S. tariffs on China

President-elect Joe Biden during an event in Wilmington, Delaware, on Tuesday. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump's 25% tariffs imposed on China under the phase one trade deal will remain in place at the start of the new administration, President-elect Biden said in an interview with the New York Times published early Wednesday.

Details: "I'm not going to make any immediate moves, and the same applies to the tariffs," Biden said. He plans to conduct a full review of the current U.S. policy on China and speak with key allies in Asia and Europe to "develop a coherent strategy," he said.