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The two big things to watch this week:House Republicans are going to enter another week chipping away at a health care compromise — not really sure if it gains any votes, let alone what the policy impact would be, since there isn't enough detail for even sympathetic health care wonks to tell them.On the more urgent task — funding the government and preventing a shutdown — the GOP will have to reach some kind of agreement with Democrats on funding Affordable Care Act payments to insurers. That's possible, but only if congressional Republicans and the White House can get on the same page.The big takeaway: It would be a mistake to write off any House Republican attempt to revive its health care bill — because the White House wants a repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act so badly, and the House GOP is so reluctant to give it up, that they may keep going until they win the bare minimum votes to pass it. Then it becomes the Senate's problem.Key quote: From a GOP leadership aide: "It's hard to imagine not resolving the health care issue at this point. We are too far along to abandon the effort altogether."Where things stand:Repeal: Republican staffers are still vetting the legislative language for a possible compromise between Rep. Tom MacArthur, a leader of the moderate Tuesday Group, and Freedom Caucus chairman Mark Meadows. White House chief of staff Reince Priebus made it clear on NBC's Meet the Press that the White House would still like a vote this week if possible — but House Speaker Paul Ryan already told his GOP colleagues on Saturdaythat it won't happen until the votes are there.Insurer payments: President Trump was combative on Twitter this weekend, and so was Office of Management and Budget director Mick Mulvaney on the Sunday talk shows. But Priebus wasn't, and he sounded conciliatory on the main thing the White House wants in return for insurer payments: money to build the border wall. The lack of fighting words from congressional GOP leaders — who just want to move on — could suggest quiet movement toward an agreement.

Go deeper

Biden's Day 1 challenges: The immigration reset

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President-elect Biden has an aggressive Day One immigration agenda that relies heavily on executive actions to undo President Trump's crackdown.

Why it matters: It's not that easy. Trump issued more than 400 executive actions on immigration. Advocates are fired up. The Supreme Court could threaten the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and experts warn there could be another surge at the border.

Broncos and 49ers the latest NFL teams impacted by coronavirus crisis

From left, Denver Broncos quarterbacks Drew Lock, Brett Rypien and Jeff Driskel during an August training session at UCHealth Training Center in Englewood, Colorado. Photo: Justin Edmonds/Getty Images

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the NFL season into chaos, with all Denver Broncos quarterbacks sidelined, the San Francisco 49ers left without a home or practice ground and much of the Baltimore Ravens team unavailable, per AP.

Driving the news: The Broncos confirmed in a statement Saturday night that quarterbacks Drew Lock, Brett Rypien and Blake Bortles were identified as "high-risk COVID-19 close contacts" and will follow the NFL's mandatory five-day quarantine, making them ineligible for Sunday's game against New Orleans.

Updated 14 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release."
  2. Politics: McConnell temporarily halts in-person lunches for GOP caucus.
  3. Economy: Safety nets to disappear in DecemberAmazon hires 1,400 workers a day throughout pandemic.
  4. Education: U.S. public school enrollment drops as pandemic persists.
  5. Cities: Surge in cases forces San Francisco to impose curfew — Los Angeles County issues stay-at-home order, limits gatherings.
  6. Sports: NFL bans in-person team activities Monday, Tuesday due to COVID-19 surge — NBA announces new coronavirus protocols.
  7. World: London police arrest more than 150 during anti-lockdown protests — Thailand, Philippines sign deal with AstraZeneca for vaccine.