Oct 12, 2017

What's next for Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein hires Blair Berk, a criminal defense attorney who has previously represented Mel Gibson and Lindsay Lohan, per Hollywood Reporter: "[T]here's no statute of limitations on rape in New York."

  • Variety: "[T]he Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced a special meeting of the Academy's Board of Governors ... for Sunday ... 'to discuss the allegations against Weinstein and any actions warranted by the Academy.'"
  • Emily Smith of N.Y. Post "Page Six": Weinstein "is believed to have jetted to an Arizona rehab facility [last] night, ... despite reports that he might seek treatment in Europe."

"Weinstein Company Was Aware of Payoffs in 2015," by N.Y. Times' Megan Twohey, on A1: Despite statements that the company was shocked, "David Boies, a lawyer who represented Mr. Weinstein when his contract was up for renewal in 2015, said in an interview that the board and the company were made aware at the time of three or four confidential settlements with women."

  • "And in the waning hours of last week, as he struggled to retain control of the business, ... Weinstein fired off an email to his brother and other board members asserting that they knew about the payoffs."
  • "The effort to separate him from the company is complicated by the fact that he and his brother own 42 percent of the business, its largest share."

The L.A. Times posts a "full list" of the "astounding number" of Weinstein accusers and their allegations: "This story will be updated if and when more step forward."

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