Feb 15, 2017

What's less than "Obamacare Lite," but more than nothing?

Carolyn Kaster/AP

That's going to be the key to whether Republicans can bring their factions together to actually pass a repeal bill. They're not going to get a lot of their members with a straight repeal and no replacement, and House Speaker Paul Ryan is still pitching his "Better Way" plan as the template for their replacement goals.

But the Freedom Caucus and other hardliners are making it clear they don't want to pass anything that could be seen as "Obamacare Lite," as Rep. Raul Labrador put it yesterday. Outside conservative groups have been warning about that too. They don't want Republicans to try to measure their replacement by Democrats' goals, including trying to cover as many people, because they don't think Republicans will ever beat Democrats at that.

Key quote: " If we're just going to come back with something that does the same thing, but changes a couple of things and we just call it TrumpCare or RyanCare, then what was our fight about for the last six years?" — Labrador

Yes, but: Not everyone in Republican circles is sweating it. "We're doing the same repeal we did last time and adding as much replace as possible, which is what everyone says they want," one senior GOP aide told me. And don't forget, the conservatives have every incentive to push for "repeal first" as much as they can — but no Republican has any incentive to let the whole effort fall apart.

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Updated 16 mins ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. cities crack down on protesters

The scene near the 5th police precinct during a demonstration calling for justice for George Floyd in Minneapolis on Saturday. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.

Journalists get caught in the crosshairs as protests unfold

A man waves a Black Lives Matter flag atop the CNN logo during a protest in response to the police killing of George Floyd outside the CNN Center on May 29. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage / Getty Images

Dozens of journalists across the country tweeted videos Saturday night of themselves and their crews getting arrested, being shot at by police with rubber bullets, targeted with tear gas by authorities or assaulted by protestors.

Why it matters: The incidents show how easy it can be for the media to entangled in the stories they cover, especially during a time of civil unrest.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.