Photo: Volkswagen

I'm driving the Volkswagen e-Golf, and perhaps just for sentimental reasons, since it's about to become obsolete.

The big picture: The e-Golf will go away once a wave of new electric models from VW hits, starting next year. VW plans 70 electric vehicles across all its brands by 2028 — a total of 22 million EVs worldwide. It's the automaker's way of finally putting the past behind it after a devastating diesel emissions cheating scandal.

The e-Golf is no Tesla, with a range of just 125 miles, half that of a Tesla Model 3. But neither does it carry the Model 3's $41,000–$61,000 price tag.

  • The e-Golf starts at $31,895. The SEL Premium model I'm driving is $39,790.

Driver-assistance features come standard on higher-priced trims; optional on others. These include VW's Front Assist system combining forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking and pedestrian monitoring, plus lane-keeping assistance and adaptive cruise control.

More important, it's a hoot to drive. Put an electric powertrain in one of the world's most popular hatchbacks and there's just more to love. It's a great city car, but because of its range limitations, I wouldn't recommend it for a road trip.

The bottom line: The eGolf is an appetizer for what's to come from VW.

Go deeper: See what else Joann has been driving

Go deeper

What to watch in tonight's debate

Joe Biden (left) and President Trump (right) are facing off in Cleveland for the first presidential debate. Photos: Alex Wong (of Biden) and David Hume Kennerly (of Trump)/Getty Images

President Trump will try to break Joe Biden's composure by going after his son Hunter and other family members in tonight's first presidential debate — a campaign source tells Axios "nothing will be off the table" — while Biden plans to stick to the economy, coronavirus and new revelations about how Trump avoided paying taxes.

Driving the news: Biden and Trump are set to debate at 9 p.m. ET at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, and it will be moderated by Fox News' Chris Wallace.

Massive layoffs hit Disney theme parks

A person posing for a photo in front of the iconic Disney castle at Disneyland Resort in Hong Kong on Sept, 25. Photo: Miguel Candela Poblacion/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Disney is laying off 28,000 workers at its theme parks and experiences and consumer products divisions, the company said in a statement Tuesday.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has forced the company to close its California theme parks and limit attendance at re-opened parks elsewhere around the U.S. Around 67% of the 28,000 laid off workers are part-time employees, according to Josh D’Amaro, chairman of Disney's parks, experiences and products division.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
29 mins ago - Economy & Business

United States of burnout

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Postponed vacations, holidays in isolation and back-to-back virtual meetings are taking a toll on millions of American workers.

Why it matters: As we head into the fall, workers are feeling the burnout. Such a collective fraying of mental health at work could dampen productivity and hinder economic growth across the country.