Jul 26, 2019

What we're driving: 2019 Toyota Tundra Limited

2019 Toyota Tundra. Photo: Toyota

This week, I'm driving a 2019 Toyota Tundra Limited double cab pickup truck, which came in handy for hauling our old refrigerator to Habitat for Humanity.

The big picture: Like all Toyotas, the Tundra gets high marks for reliability. The problem is it hasn't received a complete makeover in more than a decade. Up against giants like the Ford F-150, Ram 1500 and Chevrolet Silverado, the Tundra just can't compete.

  • With a 5.7-liter V-8 engine kicking out 381 horsepower, the Tundra is not best-in-class, but it's certainly a capable truck.

Still it falls short in a number of ways:

  • It lacks the bells and whistles that make other modern trucks so useful, like corner steps, configurable tailgates and storage lockboxes.
  • Its 17 mpg highway mileage pales in comparison to Ram's 21 mpg, with a similar-sized engine.
  • It doesn't have a 360-degree camera like most competitors to help maneuver.
  • The infotainment system feels dated, especially compared to Ram's 12-inch portrait touchscreen.

On the plus side, all 2019 Tundras come with Toyota Safety Sense assisted-driving technology, including:

  • Pre-collision warning with pedestrian detection.
  • Lane departure alert with steering assist.
  • Adaptive cruise control.
  • Automatic high beams.

The bottom line: Pickups are the new luxury vehicles, but if you're just looking to move a refrigerator, the $46,610 Tundra might be all you need.

Go deeper

What we're driving: 2020 Range Rover Evoque

2020 Range Rover Evoque. Photo: Range Rover

I'm driving the 2020 Range Rover Evoque, a compact, wedge-shaped SUV that looks like it belongs in the future.

Why it matters: Styling has always been the big selling point for the Evoque, first introduced in 2012. It's all been updated for 2020, including new retractable door handles, which are cool but take an extra second to open the door.

Go deeperArrowAug 23, 2019

What we're driving: 2019 Kia Niro EV

2019 Kia Niro EV. Photo: Kia

This week I'm driving the 2019 Kia Niro EV, a battery-powered compact with a 239-mile driving range.

The bottom line: As with most Kia brand vehicles, the Niro packs in a lot of features ordinarily found in more expensive cars. The sticker price on my tester, outfitted with the top-of-the-line EX Premium trim plus a $1,080 cold-weather package and $1,000 worth of other extra goodies, is $47,155 before a $7,500 federal tax incentive for EVs.

Go deeperArrowAug 2, 2019

Nuro could help set rules for unmanned delivery vehicles

Nuro's unmanned delivery vehicles are half the width of a Toyota Camry and limited to 25 mph. Photo: Nuro

U.S. transportation officials are considering a new class of motor vehicles — ones with no occupants — in preparation for an expected surge in robot deliveries of everything from groceries to pizza.

Why it matters: Unmanned delivery vehicles are different from self-driving passenger cars, but both require exemptions from federal motor vehicle safety standards (FMVSS) in order to operate on public roads.

Go deeperArrowAug 23, 2019