Infiniti QX80 Limited's interior. Photo: Infiniti

This week I'm driving a 2019 Infiniti QX80 Limited, which, to me, is a big truck in a fancy dress.

Why it matters: The luxury SUV market is highly competitive, and in both performance and features, the Infiniti doesn't quite match up to premium competitors like the Mercedes GLS 450 or the Cadillac Escalade.

  • The "base" QX80 Luxe starts at $66,795, about the same as the fully loaded Nissan Armada Platinum Reserve I drove last December. (They share a platform.)
  • The QX80 Limited will set you back $91,450.

For that price, you should expect to be bathed in luxury. But the Infiniti tries a little too hard: Its open-pore wood accents, faux-suede surfaces, and two-tone color scheme are just too gaudy for my tastes.

  • But there are some nice convenience features, like the telescopic steering wheel that helpfully retracts when you're getting in or out of the vehicle, and the 360-degree camera makes parking this behemoth a little easier.

Standard driver assistance features include automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection and technology that keeps you in your lane or prevents you from backing over someone or something.

  • A predictive forward collision warning system can even warn the driver of risks two cars ahead.

The bottom line: Infiniti's flagship SUV is commanding, but does anybody need a $91,000 truck?

Go deeper: See what else Joann has been driving

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Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 12,859,834 — Total deaths: 567,123 — Total recoveries — 7,062,085Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 3,297,501— Total deaths: 135,155 — Total recoveries: 1,006,326 — Total tested: 40,282,176Map.
  3. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000 — NYC reports zero coronavirus deaths for first time since pandemic hit.
  4. Public health: Ex-FDA chief projects "apex" of South's coronavirus curve in 2-3 weeks — Coronavirus testing czar: Lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table"
  5. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Trump's chief of staff, Mark Meadows, has told several White House staffers he's fed specific nuggets of information to suspected leakers to see if they pass them on to reporters — a trap that would confirm his suspicions. "Meadows told me he was doing that," said one former White House official. "I don't know if it ever worked."

Why it matters: This hunt for leakers has put some White House staffers on edge, with multiple officials telling Axios that Meadows has been unusually vocal about his tactics. So far, he's caught only one person, for a minor leak.

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Lauren Boebert posing in her restaurant in Rifle, Colorado, on April 24. Photo: Emily Kask/AFP

At least 11 Republican congressional nominees have publicly supported or defended the QAnon conspiracy theory movement or some of its tenets — and more aligned with the movement may still find a way onto ballots this year.

Why it matters: Their progress shows how a fringe online forum built on unsubstantiated claims and flagged as a threat by the FBI is seeking a foothold in the U.S. political mainstream.