Jan 26, 2017

What to know from Theresa May's speech

Matt Rourke / AP

In a speech to Republicans in Philadelphia, British Prime Minister Theresa May said:

  • The U.S. and U.K. are at the start of crafting a great trade agreement, but that the new deal must serve both national interests. (This can't happen until after Britain official leaves the EU.)
  • U.S. and U.K. should stop intervening in other countries to try to "remake the world in our image."
  • On working with Trump, she said, "Haven't you ever noticed, sometimes opposites attract?" She added she would challenge Trump on issues like torture.
  • When it comes to Putin, May's advice was "to engage, but beware."
  • She said "there is nothing inevitable about conflict between Russia and the west," and that the countries should work to make "cooperation more likely than conflict."
  • She is pushing for major reform of multinational organizations to better serve the nations that formed them. She added, "The most important institution is and should always be the nationstate."
  • NATO should be "as equipped to fight cyber warfare" as it is to fight conventional warfare.
  • U.S. and U.K. should work together to fight the "evil ideology" of "extremist Islamism."

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