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Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Approximately 100 million Capital One customers in the U.S. and Canada are caught up in a data hack that the bank claims happened in March. If you think you're among them, here are a few steps you can take.

Where to start: The bank says it will notify all affected customers, including 140,000 whose social security numbers were compromised, and offer identify protection services and credit monitoring. Both are worth taking advantage of.

In the meantime, check your statements for unusual activity. If you see anything unexpected, report it to Capital One immediately through their app or online. Moreover, Capital One will allow you to freeze your accounts while the situation is worked out.

What's next: Consider freezing your credit if you don't plan to apply for new loans or credit cards. This will prevent bad actors from attempting to take out new loans or open lines of credit in your name, as banks will be unable to view your credit history.

What to watch: Continue keeping eyes on your credit. There are a number of low-cost credit monitoring services that can help by alerting you to potential fraud. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau further recommends changing passwords often, checking your credit regularly, filing taxes early and more.

Be smart: The breach only affected people who applied for Capital One credit cards between 2005 and 2019.

Go deeper: How to file a claim over Equifax's data breach

Go deeper

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.

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