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Sen. James Lankford Photo: Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

Republican senators James Lankford (Okla.), Bob Corker (Tenn.) and Jeff Flake (Ariz.) want a tweak to the tax bill which would allow changes to be made if in 5 years the plan doesn't produce the economic growth Republicans are banking on, Lankford told Hugh Hewitt on Tuesday. He said that if their proposal is added, the three would most likely vote yes on the bill, although he didn't want to speak for Flake and Corker.

Why it matters: Flake and Corker have become wild cards since announcing they won't run for re-election, and both have expressed reservations about the GOP tax bill. But the "changes" in 5 years would most likely include tax hikes, which could be unpopular with the public and President Trump who has always touted across-the-board tax cuts.

Yes, but securing their votes still doesn't guarantee that the bill would pass. John McCain, Susan Collins, Ron Johnson and Steve Daines are also skeptical about the bill — and it only takes three no votes to fail.

Key quote: "We are all making our best educated guess of exactly what the rates should be. We're trying to bring them down as fast, as far as possible. What I have asked for is a way to have a five year lookout. And if we get five years down the road and realize that the revenue is not coming on, the economic growth has not happened as expected, I don't want our deficits to accelerate," Lankford told Hewitt.

Go deeper: The Wall Street Journal's look at the proposal.

Go deeper

Updated 6 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

Screenshot: Fox News

President Trump has delivered a farewell speech and departed Washington for the last time on Air Force One, kicking off the day that will culminate with President-elect Joe Biden taking office.

What's next: The inaugural celebration for young Americans is being livestreamed, starting at 10am.

Updated 22 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump departs on final Air Force One flight

President Trump and his family took off on Air Force One at 9 a.m. on Wednesday morning for the final time en route to Florida.

The big picture: Trump's final hours as president were punctuated by his decisions to snub his successor's inauguration and grant pardons to many of his allies who have been swept up in corruption scandals.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Janet Yellen said all the right things to reassure the markets

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Treasury Secretary nominee and former Fed chair Janet Yellen's confirmation hearing before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday showed markets just what they can expect from the administration of President-elect Joe Biden: more of what they got under President Trump — at least for now.

What it means: Investors and big companies reaped the benefits of ultralow U.S. interest rates and low taxes for most of Trump's term as well as significant increases in government spending, even before the coronavirus pandemic.