Sep 7, 2017

What ending DACA could mean for the U.S. economy

The deportation of 800,000 DACA recipients could slash the United States' GDP by about $433 billion over the next 10 years, per an estimate by the left-leaning think tank Center for American Progress. Here's how the end of DACA could impact the U.S. economy, state by state.

Data: Center for American Progress; Map: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Highlights:

  • 91% of DACA recipients are employed, the Center for American Progress estimates.
  • 9 states will lose more than $1 billion annually if their DACA workers leave the workforce.
  • California would be hit the hardest, losing $11.6 billion in GDP every year. Close to 188,000 recipients work in California.
  • Massachusetts will see the highest impact per worker. Each worker lost will take away $87,875 from GDP, annually.
  • 30,000 people could lose their jobs every month as their DACA work permits expire, according to an estimate by FWD.us, Mark Zuckerberg's pro-immigration group.

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