Oct 25, 2017

Weinstein fallout: Statehouses say #MeToo

main stairway leading up to the third floor of the Senate and House chambers at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. Photo: Seth Perlman / AP

Following the revelations that Harvey Weinstein has reportedly assaulted, raped, and sexually harassed women in exchange for advancing their careers in Hollywood, lawmakers, lobbyists, and consultants are calling out similar behavior in statehouses nationwide, where sexual favors are allegedly offered in exchange for legislative favors. Illinois is the latest to come forward, with more than 130 women signing on to a letter signed "The Women Who Make Illinois Run." AP's Sophia Tareen reports:

Why it matters: "Several risk factors for sexual harassment identified by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission are deep-seated at state capitols: Lack of diversity, power disparities, tolerating or encouraging alcohol consumption, and many young staffers."

  • "Illinois became the latest to join the chorus, as signatures piled up [yesterday] on an open letter describing harassment and intimidation for women trying to negotiate legislation and work on campaigns."
  • "In California this week, the Senate hired a law firm to investigate after women described a culture of sexual intimidation." Last week more than 140 women came forward alleging sexual misconduct my powerful men in the legislature.
  • "Lawmakers in Oregon and Rhode Island have spoken up to accuse male colleagues of inappropriate touching or suggesting that sexual favors be a condition for advancing bills."
  • What's next: "More women are coming forward with stories, some are naming names and states are making fresh promises of investigations and of legislation."

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U.S. coronavirus updates: White House studies models projecting virus peak

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The White House and other institutions are observing several models to better understand and prepare cities for when the coronavirus is expected to peak in the U.S.

The state of play: The coronavirus is expected to peak in the U.S. in two weeks, but many states like Virginia and Maryland will see their individual peaks well after that, according to a model by the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health

FDA authorizes two-minute antibody testing kit to detect coronavirus

Currently, it takes days to produce results from testing kits. Photo: Sergei Malgavko\TASS via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency approval Tuesday for a serological testing kit produced by Bodysphere Inc. that can detect a positive or negative result for COVID-19 in two minutes.

Why it matters: Access to testing has improved in the U.S. thanks to commercial labs, but the average wait time for a patient's results is four to five days — with some reports of it taking more than a week.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 3 hours ago - Health