Mar 3, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Volkswagen teases the ID.4, its upcoming electric SUV

The ID.4. Photo: Volkswagen

Volkswagen shared Tuesday more information and images of a small electric SUV that the automaker announced will be called the ID.4.

Why it matters, via Car and Driver: "The electric crossover will be the first vehicle on VW's MEB electric platform to make its way to the United States and will initially launch in Europe later in 2020."

The big picture: CNET reports,"So, apart from its name and its platform, what do we know about ID 4?"

  • "Well, VW claims that it's got an especially slippery shape, which will help it to eke out a claimed range of up to 310 miles (though that range is likely to drop significantly once we get EPA range estimates) and we know it'll be out later this year."

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Ford touts Mustang Mach-E's winter performance to reassure consumers about electric vehicles

Screenshot of Ford video showing the Mustang Mach-E in the snow

Ford is circulating a new video that touts the ability of the upcoming Mustang Mach-E electric vehicle to handle tough winter conditions.

Why it matters: Reassuring drivers that electric cars can meet all their needs just as well, or better, than their internal-combustion counterparts is important for pushing them into the mainstream.

GM begins historic shift to electric vehicles

GM CEO Mary Barra with the company's flexible electric vehicle platform. Photo: GM

General Motors on Wednesday took the wraps off a broad lineup of electric vehicles powered by a new proprietary battery technology, representing a dramatic transformation of the 112-year-old automaker.

Why it matters: It's a $20 billion bet over the next five years that GM hopes both consumers and investors will endorse as the company walks a tightrope between maximizing sales of its profitable gas-powered trucks and SUVs and delivering on a long-term vision for a cleaner, less congested world.

EPA and DOT to unveil new gas mileage and carbon emissions rules

Reproduced from EPA; Chart: Axios Visuals

The Transportation Department and the EPA are scheduled to unveil final rules Tuesday that set vehicle mileage and carbon emissions requirements through model year 2026 — but the battle over these regulations is not over.

Why it matters: Transportation overtook electric power as the largest source of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions a few years ago, but the new rules are slated to be far weaker than the Obama-era requirements they're replacing.