Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Jeff Chiu / AP

Capping off the last several days of headlines about Uber's long-awaited investigation about its workplace issues, Fortune executive editor Adam Lashinsky sat down with Recode executive editor Kara Swisher to discuss his new book, Wild Ride, on the ever-embattled ride-hailing company.

Why it matters: Despite its many controversies, Uber has become a highly influential company and the highest-valued startup in history. Its fate is sure to have an impact on the business world, whether it succeeds and goes public or goes down in flames.

Here are a few of Lashinsky's comments from their conversation on Wednesday at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco:

On CEO Travis Kalanick's recently announced leave of absence:

"I read that as [him] not leaving at all."

On Uber's ability to go public despite all its notoriety:

"We can discuss the morality of it but we know that Silicon Valley venture capitalists will tolerate almost anything…. And the same is true for public shareholders."

On Uber's significance:

"I am far more interested in what the app enabled than phrases like 'the gig economy.'"

On Uber's aggressive methods of operating:

"I think it's possible to do what they're doing without being shifty--Lyft is doing it."

On addressing Uber's often sexist culture in the book:

"I could have done more and I could have done better." Lashinsky added that, "When you read my book you get a sense of an immature grownup running an immature company."

On whether Uber will actually change its workplace following the report:

"Given the scrutiny that they're under it's gonna be hard for them not to take them seriously… I don't believe that every person is rotten."

On the viability of Uber's business model:

"Even with what they released, we don't have a super clear of the plans."

On whether Uber can salvage its brand:

"Brands can rejuvenate."

On who he thinks would be a great COO for the company:

Thomas Staggs (formerly Disney's COO), or Alan Mulally (formerly Ford's CEO and president)

On what will happen to Uber:

"I'm gonna give you the cup half full: it's a company with global operations -- and I'm reaching for a cliche -- and mindshare…. If they can get past that and you bring in the right leadership to run that global operation, that would be the cup half full," said Lashinsky.
"I think they're gonna get sold… to Google," said Swisher.

Go deeper

Scoop: FDA chief called to West Wing

Stephen Hahn. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows has summoned FDA commissioner Stephen Hahn to the West Wing for a 9:30am meeting Tuesday to explain why he hasn't moved faster to approve the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine, two senior administration officials told Axios.

Why it matters: The meeting is shaping up to be tense, with Hahn using what the White House will likely view as kamikaze language in a preemptive statement to Axios: "Let me be clear — our career scientists have to make the decision and they will take the time that’s needed to make the right call on this important decision."

Scoop: Schumer's regrets

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images   

Chuck Schumer told party donors during recent calls that the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the fact that Cal Cunningham "couldn't keep his zipper up" crushed Democrats' chances of regaining the Senate, sources with direct knowledge of the conversations tell Axios.

Why it matters: Democrats are hoping for a 50-50 split by winning two upcoming special elections in Georgia. But their best chance for an outright Senate majority ended when Cunningham lost in North Carolina and Sen. Susan Collins won in Maine.

Trump's coronavirus adviser Scott Atlas resigns

Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty

Scott Atlas, a controversial member of the White House coronavirus task force, handed in his resignation on Monday, according to three administration officials who discussed Atlas' resignation with Axios.

Why it matters: President Trump brought in Atlas as a counterpoint to NIAID director Anthony Fauci, whose warnings about the pandemic were dismissed by the Trump administration. With Trump now fixated on election fraud conspiracy theories, Atlas' detail comes to a natural end.