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Elise Amendola / AP

When researcher Chris Vickery told Verizon last month it was the victim of a cyber breach, it took over a week to secure the data that had been exposed, ZDNet reports. More than 14 million U.S. customers had their data exposed, including their addresses, names, phone numbers, and account PINs, according to security firm UpGuard, where Vickery works.

What it means: That's enough to get you into someone's account, even if there's two-factor authentication. European telecoms provider Orange may have also had some data on the exposed server.

How it happened: Verizon said an employee at NICE Systems, a third-party vendor, incorrectly left the sensitive data on an unprotected Amazon S3 storage server. CNN reports Verizon gave a third party access to this information to facilitate customer service calls (only customers who called customer service in the last six months had their information exposed).

85 of the Fortune 100 are NICE customers and the company has been linked with government intelligence agencies around the world, per Privacy International.

Implications: Charles Goldberg, Senior Director of Product for Thales e-Security, pointed out that while "an unfortunate incident in its own right, the Verizon leak is not a solitary occurrence. Amazon S3 buckets are vulnerable to data leaks…even very well trained professionals can find it challenging to manage access controls."

Verizon's take: Verizon said 6 million customers' personal data was leaked, rather than 14, according to CNN. There is "no indication that the information has been compromised."

What to watch: If the FCC investigates the breach. (Cosumer rights group Public Knowledge has called on the FCC to do so.)

Go deeper

Trump set to appear at Pennsylvania GOP hearing on voter fraud claims

President Trumpat the White House on Tuesday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump is due to join his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Wednesday at a Republican-led state Senate Majority Policy Committee hearing to discuss alleged election irregularities.

Why it matters: This would be his first trip outside of the DMV since Election Day and comes shortly after GSA ascertained the results, formally signing off on a transition to President-elect Biden.

Scoop: Trump tells confidants he plans to pardon Michael Flynn

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

President Trump has told confidants he plans to pardon his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts, two sources with direct knowledge of the discussions tell Axios.

Behind the scenes: Sources with direct knowledge of the discussions said Flynn will be part of a series of pardons that Trump issues between now and when he leaves office.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
8 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.