Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Mike Pompeo, CIA director and now Secretary of State designate, talking to Senator Bob Corker, chair of the Foreign Relations Committee, on March 19, 2018. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

Mike Pompeo’s Senate hearing today, to assess his fitness for the office of Secretary of State, comes at a tense moment of global conflict and displacement. If confirmed, he will lead the department that oversees U.S. admission and resettlement of refugees and manages contributions of lifesaving relief and assistance.

Why it matters: These issues are particularly critical in Syria, where renewed violence is likely to exacerbate the already abysmal humanitarian situation. Pompeo’s policies will have real implications for millions of people in Syria and neighboring countries — and for an international system badly strained by the years-long civil war.

The next Secretary of State will also be influential in shaping what role the United States plays in hammering out a Global Compact for Refugees. World leaders are nearing the finish line on that two-year effort, and the new framework — which will guide responses to displacement for years to come — is expected to be adopted when they convene in New York in September. With three rounds of formal consultations left, American input could be consequential.

In the past, however, Pompeo has opposed refugee policies he views as lax. While in Congress, he cosponsored a bill that would have banned all refugees — immediately, and with no exceptions — from entering the U.S. The measure, put forward in the wake of the mass shooting in Orlando, would have gone even further than Trump’s campaign trail proposal to restrict Muslim immigration.

The bottom line: Secretaries of State have enormous influence over how the United States responds to refugees. That’s especially the case right now. If Pompeo’s past is prelude, he’s not likely to be a forward-leaning player. That’s a shame, since the lives and futures of more than 22 million of them — not to mention the enlightened self-interest of the U.S. — are at stake.

Jessica Brandt is a fellow in foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
52 mins ago - World

Americans increasingly see China as an enemy

One in three Americans, and a majority of Republicans, now view China as an enemy of the United States, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center.

By the numbers: Just 9% of Americans consider China a "partner," while 55% see Beijing as a "competitor" and 34% as an "enemy."

Scoop: Leaked HHS docs spotlight Biden's child migrant dilemma

A group of undocumented immigrants walk toward a Customs and Border Patrol station after being apprehended. Photo: Sergio Flores/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Fresh internal documents from the Department of Health and Human Services show how quickly the number of child migrants crossing the border is overwhelming the administration's stretched resources.

Driving the news: In the week ending March 1, the Border Patrol referred to HHS custody an average of 321 children per day, according to documents obtained by Axios. That's up from a weekly average of 203 in late January and early February — and just 47 per day during the first week of January.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
2 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Mounting emissions data paints bleak picture on Paris climate goals

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Researchers keep finding new ways to reveal that nations are together showing very few signs of getting on track to meet the Paris Agreement's goals.

One big question: That's whether a spate of recent analyses to that effect, and scientific reports coming later this year, will move the needle on meaningful new policies (not just targets).