The New York Times headquarters in Manhattan. Photo: Bebeto Matthews / AP

American newsrooms are on average 39% female and 17% non-white, per a 2017 survey of 661 news organizations analyzed by Nieman Lab. The U.S. population as a whole is 39% non-white.

The big picture: These numbers haven't significantly changed since 2001, when newsrooms were 39% female and 14% non-white.

The newsrooms
  • The Washington Post: 50% male, 69% white
  • The New York Times: 57% male, 81% white
  • The Wall Street Journal: 55% male, 81% white
  • The Los Angeles Times: 60% male, 67% white
  • The Chicago Tribune: 61% male, 81% white
  • The Boston Globe: 62% male, 83% white
  • USA Today: 67% male, 78% white

Worth noting: Survey results indicated better-than-average gender and racial balance in online-only newsrooms. Of journalists working at those news organizations, 48% are female and 24% are people of color.

Go deeper

Obama: The rest of us have to live with the consequences of what Trump's done

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Campaigning for Joe Biden at a car rally in Miami on Saturday, Barack Obama railed against President Trump's response to the coronavirus pandemic, saying "the rest of us have to live with the consequences of what he's done."

Driving the news: With less than two weeks before the election, the Biden campaign is drawing on the former president's popularity with Democrats to drive turnout and motivate voters.

Murkowski says she'll vote to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court

Sen. Lisa Murkowski. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said Saturday that she'll vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday, despite her opposition to the process that's recently transpired.

The big picture: Murkowski's decision leaves Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) as the only Republican expected to vote against Barrett.