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CafeCredit.com via Flickr CC

U.S. financial technology startups are losing investment share, while it's becoming easier for Asian fintech startups, as noted in a TechCrunch post by Israel-based financial analyst Nikolai Kuznetov.

It's been a steep plunge: U.S. fintech startups last year secured 37.5% of the $2.4 billion invested into the sector, but the number of companies dropped by 68%, according to KPMG. Investments (by amount invested) in Asia grew 150% from Q2 2016 to Q4 2016 as the U.S. dropped consistently.

We're losing to Asia: The five largest investments in the last five quarters were all in Asia. Plus, for the last two quarters, Asian fintech companies attracted about $700 million more in VC funding than did U.S. fintech companies.

Part of the problem: The two states — New York and California — that host the most U.S. fintech startups, ranked last on a recent British Treasury list of places with friendly policies toward fintech companies. Consider this: the EU, China, and India each recently eased laws and regulations that would have limited fintech companies.

Why this matters: This is likely to ring alarm bells for Donald Trump, who despises falling behind, and especially despises falling behind Asian countries. It also could be a symptom of the expected hike in interest rates in the U.S. and the belief that banks are going to grow their bottom line and are less inclined to invest in fintech.

Go deeper

Inaugural address: Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Joe Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 55 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden and Vice President Harris review readiness of military troops, a long-standing tradition to signify the peaceful transfer of power.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters to disrupt certification of Biden's victory. Trump did not attend Wednesday's ceremony.