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Newborn babies sleep in a hospital nursery. Photo: Tommaso Di Girolamo / AGF / UIG via Getty Images

After years of sharp declines in sleep-related infant deaths in the U.S., progress has slowed considerably, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns in a new report.

Key stat: Roughly 3,500 infants die from sleep-related issues in America annually. The causes range from SIDS and accidental suffocation in cribs to deaths from unknown causes. Despite intensive public education efforts, only half of mothers say they receive “safe sleep” advice from healthcare providers during pre- and post-natal visits, CDC said.

A high-profile, national public education campaign to raise awareness about the risks of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome contributed to dramatic decreases in sleep-related infant deaths during the 1990s. But in recent years the rate of these deaths has held fairly constant.

  • Despite intensive “safe sleep” public education efforts, CDC found that roughly 1 in 5 mothers were still placing their infants to sleep on their side or stomach.
  • More than half of mothers reported that they at least occasionally allowed infants to sleep in the same bed with them.
  • More than a third said they put loose or soft materials in their infants’ cribs. Unsafe sleep practices tended to be more prevalent among mothers who were younger than 25, black or poorly educated.

Be smart:  Here are some of the key “safe sleep” practices recommended for infants by the American Academy of Pediatrics:

  • Place infants on their backs during sleep times (including naps).
  • Make sure infants are sleeping on a firm surface.
  • Don’t let infants sleep with soft objects or loose bedding.
  • Parents shouldn’t sleep in the same bed with their babies.

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Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.

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