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Photo: Manuel Medir/Getty Images

Two of America's largest Spanish-language broadcasters rolled out fresh new slates of scripted programming at this year's UpFronts, including more minority characters and shorter formats.

Details: Univision unveiled a new series titled "El Corazón Nunca Se Equivoca" (The Heart is Never Wrong) about a gay couple making their way in Mexican society. Telemundo announced a new series called "Operación Pacífico" starring a female lead, based on themes about federal agents chasing after drug lords.

Between the lines: Telenovelas, born decades ago as a staple of Latin American and Spanish culture, have since evolved to become shorter and less reliant on the "damsel in distress" romantic melodrama theme than they were during their peak in the 1990s.

  • "We have evolved the genre significantly with high quality, edgier action-packed contemporary stories ripped from the headlines and presented in shorter formats and over multiple seasons," said Cesar Conde, chairman of NBCUniversal International Group and NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises.
  • "Today, our dramas are diverse, inclusive, authentic, and contemporary and our casting and storylines reflect our community's world in vivid, compelling ways. We challenge gender stereotypes, and feature a broader mosaic of talent, addressing important topics, that inspire thoughtful dialogue that continues long after an episode airs," said Jessica Rodriguez, CMO & President of Entertainment, Univision.

The big picture: While the past few years have seen breakout moments for Hispanic music and movies, TV is still waiting for its breakout IP moment, argues Alejandro Uribe, CEO of Exile Content Studio, a premium content studio for Hispanic content.

What's next: Uribe argues that the Hispanic content world has yet to fully explore formats like comics and anime, and in the future, studios and networks will begin to harvest a wealth of untold stories into two main scripted formats:

  • The tele-series: This heir of the telenovela will continue to be popular on linear TV and with older audiences. It will continue to be the main stay of broadcasters/traditional Spanish-language producers (similar to the sitcom phenomenon of U.S. broadcasters).
  • Premium series: These series will likely garner more attention, especially for younger generations, and will be the mainstay of tech platforms like Netflix and some local cable channels.

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DOJ: Capitol rioter threatened to "assassinate" Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Supporters of former President Trump storm the U.S. Captiol on Jan. 6. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A Texas man who has been charged with storming the U.S. Capitol in the deadly Jan. 6 siege posted death threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), the Department of Justice said.

The big picture: Garret Miller faces five charges in connection to the riot by supporters of former President Trump, including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and making threats. According to court documents, Miller posted violent threats online the day of the siege, including tweeting “Assassinate AOC.”

Schumer calls for IG probe into alleged plan by Trump, DOJ lawyer to oust acting AG

Jeffrey Clark speaks next to Deputy US Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen at a news conference in October. Photo: Yuri Gripas/AFP via Getty Images.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Saturday called for the Justice Department inspector general to investigate an alleged plan by former President Trump and a DOJ lawyer to remove the acting attorney general and replace him with someone more willing to investigate unfounded claims of election fraud.

Driving the news: The New York Times first reported Friday that the lawyer, Jeffrey Clark, allegedly devised "ways to cast doubt on the election results and to bolster Mr. Trump’s continuing legal battles and the pressure on Georgia politicians. Because Mr. [Jeffrey] Rosen had refused the president’s entreaties to carry out those plans, Mr. Trump was about to decide whether to fire Mr. Rosen and replace him with Mr. Clark."