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Photo: Kevin Abele/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

The University of California regents voted unanimously on Thursday to suspend SAT and ACT testing requirements for admission through 2024, and to move to full elimination or implementation of a replacement test by 2025.

Why it matters: ACT and SAT testing requirements have come under scrutiny in recent years, and Thursday's decision could broadly alter the college admissions process. Advocates argue that university admission based on standardized test scores unjustly favors affluent students who can afford to take the tests multiple times or seek tutoring.

The state of play: The plan will make the tests optional for students over the next two years, and then eliminate them entirely for California students in the third and fourth years.

  • The plan notes: "By 2025, any use of the ACT/SAT would be eliminated for California students and a new, UC-based test would be required."
  • "If, by 2025, the new test is either not feasible or not ready, consideration of the ACT/SAT would still be eliminated for California students."

Go deeper

Aug 28, 2020 - Health

Community colleges struggle with hands-on classes

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Programs at community colleges and technical schools that require hands-on learning — like welding or auto repair — have a unique challenge as they try to stay open while keeping students safe.

Why it matters: One-third of higher education students enrolled last spring were from a community college. And their student bodies are often higher-risk than traditional colleges', with more students who work, come from communities hit hard by the virus, or are older.

Kim Hart, author of Cities
Aug 27, 2020 - Health

Most urban schools will start the year with all-remote learning

Reproduced from a CRPE report; Chart: Axios Visuals

About half of school districts across the country will return to school buildings in the fall — but the majority of the big-city school districts that also serve large numbers of at-risk students will be doing remote learning for the foreseeable future.

The big picture: There's a stark divide in school reopening plans between urban and rural districts, according to an analysis by the Center for Reinventing Public Education at the University of Washington Bothell.

Schumer: Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

Why it matters: Trump is the only president in U.S. history to be impeached twice. The House voted to impeach the former president on Jan. 13 on a single charge: incitement of insurrection for the Jan. 6 breach of the U.S. Capitol, which resulted in five deaths.