Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

United Airlines announced Wednesday that it will require customers to wear face masks in all airport spaces, warning that those who do not comply could face a ban as long as mask requirements remain in place.

The state of play: The rule — in addition to United's inflight mask mandate — applies throughout customers' time in the airport, including while checking in, spending time in lounges, at service counters and during boarding.

  • Customers who do not comply will first receive a verbal request from an employee — and an offer of a free mask. A second request will result in the provision of a "reminder card" with United's mask policy.
  • Those who continue to not comply could be refused travel and be subject to a ban.

What they're saying: "A mask is about protecting the safety of others, and I'm proud of the aggressive and proactive steps United Airlines has taken to ensure people are wearing a face covering in the airports where we operate and onboard the aircraft we fly," United CEO Scott Kirby said in a statement.

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