A boy eats ice cream during the Children's Day celebration in Bangkok, Thailand in January. Photo: Chaiwat Subprasom/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Multinational corporate giant Unilever pledged this week that it will stop advertising food and drinks to children under 12 through traditional media, and kids younger than 13 on social media by the end of the year.

What they're saying: Citing the World Health Organization's alarm bell on childhood obesity, Unilever says that ice cream brand Wall's will not exceed 110 calories or contain more than 12g of sugar per portion.

Between the lines: For Unilever to cut kids' sugar intake to 12g per ice cream serving size, artificial sweeteners may be added, the director of marketing initiatives for the nonprofit Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity told the Washington Post.

“Their bottom line is profit, not public health. Without policies that put some rules around marketing to children across all companies, it’s hard to believe one company is going to sacrifice its profits to effectively reduce consumption of unhealthy foods. Policies would be good in that sense because they level the playing field.”
— Fran Fleming-Milici told the Post in an interview

Go deeper: Study: 49% of American adults projected to be obese by 2030

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Facebook boycott organizers share details on their Zuckerberg meeting

Facebook is in the midst of the largest ad boycott in its history, with nearly 1,000 brands having stopped paid advertising in July because they feel Facebook hasn't done enough to remove hate speech from its namesake app and Instagram.

Axios Re:Cap spoke with the boycott's four main organizers, who met on Tuesday with CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other top Facebook executives, to learn why they organized the boycott, what they took from the meeting, and what comes next.

Boycott organizers slam Facebook following tense virtual meeting

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Civil rights leaders blasted Facebook's top executives shortly after speaking with them on Tuesday, saying that the tech giant's leaders "failed to meet the moment" and were "more interested in having a dialogue than producing outcomes."

Why it matters: The likely fallout from the meeting is that the growing boycott of Facebook's advertising platform, which has reached nearly 1000 companies in less than a month, will extend longer than previously anticipated, deepening Facebook's public relations nightmare.

Steve Scalise PAC invites donors to fundraiser at Disney World

Photo: Kevin Lamarque-Pool/Getty Images

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise’s PAC is inviting lobbyists to attend a four-day “Summer Meeting” at Disney World's Polynesian Village in Florida, all but daring donors to swallow their concern about coronavirus and contribute $10,000 to his leadership PAC.

Why it matters: Scalise appears to be the first House lawmakers to host an in-person destination fundraiser since the severity of pandemic became clear. The invite for the “Summer Meeting” for the Scalise Leadership Fund, obtained by Axios, makes no mention of COVID-19.