Jun 7, 2018

Undocumented NYC pizza delivery man faces deportation after ICE call

Protestors rally in support of Pablo Villavicencio. Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

"He Delivered Pizza to an Army Base in Brooklyn. Now He Faces Deportation" — N.Y. Times' Liz Robbins on the plight of Pablo Villavicencio, an undocumented pizza delivery man.

The backdrop: "According to his wife, Sandra Chica, he presented a New York City identification card, as he had done in the past. The card, provided through a program called IDNYC, was supposed to give undocumented immigrants a method of proving their identification when dealing with city agencies."

  • "But on that day, Ms. Chica said, it was not enough for the military police officer on duty, who said Mr. Villavicencio needed a driver’s license, which he did not have."
  • "A background check revealed an open order of deportation from 2010. Military personnel detained him and called Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers, who took him into custody."
  • Justin Brannan, a Democratic city councilman representing Brooklyn: “Is this city, state and nation safer because they took a pizza delivery guy off the street?”

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Coronavirus spreads to more countries, and U.S. ups its case count

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus continues to spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting those are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the U.S. Meanwhile, Italy reported its first virus-related death on Friday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,359 people and infected more than 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel, Lebanon and Iran.

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Wells Fargo agrees to pay $3 billion to settle consumer abuse charges

Clients use an ATM at a Wells Fargo Bank in Los Angeles, Calif. Photo: Ronen Tivony/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Wells Fargo agreed to a pay a combined $3 billion to the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday for opening millions of fake customer accounts between 2002 and 2016, the SEC said in a press release.

The big picture: The fine "is among the largest corporate penalties reached during the Trump administration," the Washington Post reports.