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The Trump administration is keeping the United Nations in the dark, at least so far, when it comes to the future of U.S. participation in the global climate accord struck in Paris in 2015.

We have not heard any clear signals. Of course the U.S. is a party to the agreement, so we continue to see the U.S. as the very important partner that it is to us. — Patricia Espinosa, the executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, to reporters in Washington on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The absence of clear information to the U.N. is another sign that Trump isn't ready to follow through on his campaign pledge to end U.S. participation in the deal—at least for now.

The Bonn, Germany-based Espinosa said shortly before her current trip to the U.S. that she was seeking a meeting with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson here, but said Tuesday that it wasn't happening. Still, she carefully declined to cast it as a snub from the Trump administration.

"They were … just looking at the possibility, but it was not confirmed," Espinosa told reporters at Georgetown University ahead of Tuesday afternoon lecture. "There are so many commitments that high-level officials have." She said the dates of her visit were timed around her lecture.

What's Next? Espinosa said onstage that the uncertainty around U.S. plans has not prompted other nations to pull back on their commitments under the carbon emissions pact that's aimed at preventing the most dangerous levels of global warming.

Go deeper

Pelosi's back-to-school math problem

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) may need votes from an unlikely source — the Republican Party — if she hopes to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill by next Monday, as she's promised Democratic centrists.

Why it matters: With at least 20 progressives threatening to vote against the $1.2 trillion bipartisan bill, centrist members are banking on more than 10 Republicans to approve the bill.

By the numbers: Haitian emigration

Expand chart
Data: CBP; Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

The number of Haitians crossing the U.S.-Mexico border had been rising even before their country's president was assassinated in July and the island was struck by an earthquake a month later.

Why it matters: A spike during the past few weeks — leaving thousands waiting in a makeshift camp under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas — has prompted a crackdown and deportations by the Biden administration.

Biden's communication headaches

President Biden stands with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and French President Emmanuel Macron at the G7 summit in June. Photo: Patrick Semansky/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Boris Johnson told reporters on his way to the U.N. General Assembly on Sunday night he didn't believe it was likely that the U.S. would agree to lift its ban on vaccinated foreign travelers this week. Hours later, the White House did exactly that.

Why it matters: For the second time in less than a week, a major U.S. foreign policy decision by the Biden administration appears to have caught one of its closest allies by surprise. And neither was the first time, either.