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United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres. Photo: Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

A pivotal but delayed UN climate conference slated for November is now likely to occur a full year late — and the long pause might have a silver lining for advocates.

Driving the news: The U.K., which is hosting the event that was put on ice weeks ago due to the pandemic, yesterday proposed holding the summit in November 2021.

  • A UN body is likely to approve the request later this week.

Why it matters: The summit is meant to be a forum for countries to boost their emissions-cutting ambitions in recognition that, a half-decade after the Paris agreement, the world remains far off pace for meeting its goals.

Quick take: The new schedule, unknown when the event was postponed two months ago, means diplomats will have time to absorb how countries are — or aren't — folding low-carbon investments into pandemic response measures.

What they're saying: "While I hate to see a delay in the Paris timeline, rescheduling ... will allow countries to figure out how to achieve double wins of restarting their economies while enhancing emission reductions, as well as simultaneously increasing health and climate resilience," Andrew Light of the World Resources Institute tells me.

But, but, but: Costa Rican Environment Minister Carlos Manuel Rodríguez tells The New York Times the long delay could undercut efforts to create sustainable stimulus packages.

  • "We’re losing time," he said. "Having a [Conference of the Parties] soon would help influence global recovery plans."

Go deeper

Kushner defends COVID response: "We're still below the peak" of 2,500 daily deaths

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner defended the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus pandemic on Sunday, telling CBS News' "Face the Nation" that the current rate of deaths is "still below" the May peak of 2,500 per day and that "we know a lot more than we did five months ago."

Why it matters: The U.S. is one of the few wealthy countries that has failed to suppress the outbreak, reporting a total of over 5.3 million confirmed coronavirus cases and nearly 170,000 deaths since the start of the pandemic — by far the highest death rate in the world, according to Johns Hopkins.

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

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