SaveSave story

U.K. calls for Security Council meeting after attack on ex-spy

Scene of the attack
Military personnel in protective gear investigate the scene of the nerve agent attack in Salisbury. Photo: Adrian Dennis / AFP via Getty Images

The United Kingdom has called for an urgent meeting of the United Nations Security Council this afternoon to discuss the use of a Russian-manufactured nerve agent against ex- spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter on British soil, per the BBC. And, during a speech to the House of Commons later this morning, Prime Minister Theresa May is expected to announce a "significant" expulsion of Russian diplomats, according to Sky News.

The big picture: After May declared it "highly likely" that Russia was behind the attack during a speech on Monday, she gave the Kremlin a deadline of midnight last night to provide an appropriate response. Russia — at least publicly — continued to deny its involvement in the attack via a series of incendiary social media posts, prompting today's response from the U.K. Also today, all 29 NATO countries have asked Russia to answer the U.K.'s questions in a joint statement, per AFP's Danny Kemp.

Axios 5 hours ago
SaveSave story

How China invited a trade war

The Wall Street Journal's Greg Ip points out today that China's trade practices — particularly restricting access to Chinese markets and forcing U.S. companies to transfer technology to Chinese firms — has long been "undermining" free trade.

But, but, but.... That doesn't mean there aren't risks involved, Ip writes. "The breadth of his action elevates the potential harm to American consumers, supply chains and exporters," he says.

Erica Pandey 7 hours ago
SaveSave story

How China became a global power of espionage

Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

As China’s influence spreads to every corner of the globe under President Xi Jinping, so do its spies.

Why it matters: China has the money and the ambition to build a vast foreign intelligence network, including inside the United States. Meanwhile, American intelligence-gathering on China is falling short, Chris Johnson, a former senior China analyst for the CIA who's now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, tells Axios: "We have to at least live up to [China's] expectations. And we aren't doing that."