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Britain's Home Secretary Amber Rudd speaks during a vigil in Trafalgar Square, London, Thursday March 23, 2017 for the victims of a knife and vehicular attack. Photo: Kirsty Wigglesworth / AP

UK Home Secretary Amber Rudd said that even as ISIS and its terror cells suffer military and territorial defeats in the Middle East, "their ability to upload and re-upload" propaganda "has remained consistent."

Why it matters: Rudd, who has criticized tech companies in the past for not doing enough to collaborate with governments to access encrypted material in the wake of terrorism events, said tech companies can and should play a role in helping governments around the world to police terrorist content. That includes helping to identify that content and take it down in time to help thwart attacks on our soil. "What we have now is an online arms race. And we need our best technical experts to step up to the challenge."

The future of terrorism online, according to Rudd, who was speaking at a New America event Thursday evening, is not just about rooting out ISIS from the internet. "This is not just a Daesh problem that will go away when they do. Other groups" will try to emulate their online tactics for spreading propaganda, per Rudd.

The bind tech companies may find themselves in, per Rudd: It's about investing in the technology to find terrorist content and take it down, while recognizing that there are about 400 hours of YouTube videos uploaded per minute.

A couple of demands from Rudd:

  • "Terrorist material should be removed rom the internet within 1-2 hours" of going online.
  • "Leading tech companies should support smaller ones" in battling terrorist content.
  • "We need campaigns which call out the terrorists' lies and myths"

Go deeper

6 hours ago - World

Top general: U.S. losing time to deter China

Stanley McChrystal. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Stanley McChrystal, a top retired general and Biden adviser, tells Axios that "China's military capacity has risen much faster than people appreciate," and the U.S. is running out of time to counterbalance that in Asia and prevent a scenario such as it seizing Taiwan.

Why it matters: McChrystal, the former commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, recently briefed the president-elect as part of his cabinet of diplomatic and national security advisers. President-elect Joe Biden is considering which Trump- or Obama-era approaches to keep or discard, and what new strategies to pursue.

Progressives shift focus from Biden's Cabinet to his policy agenda

Joe Biden giving remarks in Wilmington, Del., last month. Photo: Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Some progressives tell Axios they believe the window for influencing President-elect Joe Biden’s Cabinet selections has closed, and they’re shifting focus to policy — hoping to shape Biden's agenda even before he’s sworn in.

Why it matters: The left wing of the party often draws attention for its protests, petitions and tweets, but this deliberate move reflects a determination to move beyond some fights they won't win to engage with Biden strategically, and over the long term.

Dave Lawler, author of World
8 hours ago - World

Venezuela's predictable elections herald an uncertain future

The watchful eyes of Hugo Chávez on an election poster in Caracas. Photo: Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty

Venezuelans will go to the polls on Sunday, Nicolás Maduro will complete his takeover of the last opposition-held body, and much of the world will refuse to recognize the results.

The big picture: The U.S. and dozens of other countries have backed an opposition boycott of the National Assembly elections on the grounds that — given Maduro's tactics (like tying jobs and welfare benefits to voting), track record, and control of the National Electoral Council — they will be neither free nor fair.

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