Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

Uber's board of directors met for over six hours yesterday, is what appeared to be an act of corporate masochism. In the end, they agreed to accept every recommendation made by Eric Holder, following his investigation into workplace culture issues (borne of Susan Fowler's allegations of sexual harassment and gender discrimination). What exactly that means, however, is still unclear. Full details will be shared during tomorrow's all-hands, but expect it to leak earlier.

  • Bottom line: Short-term, almost nothing that happens here will impact Uber's business. Most "normals" don't care about the palace intrigue, they just want a ride. Long-term, however, what Uber does or doesn't do this week could impact hiring and, in turn, whether Uber remains the go-to for most future rides.
  • Most talk yesterday centered around the future of Emil Michael, Uber's de facto #2 and guy who seemed bulletproof just a few weeks ago. Now he could be on his way out. If Michael does go, expect that to clear the way for the long-awaited hire of an official #2 to CEO Travis Kalanick. [Update: Michael is out.]
  • Speaking of Emil: Arguably his greatest accomplishment at Uber revolved around mega-fundraising, and it's unclear who would assume those duties. The company's finance chief announced his departure recently, with Kia scooping on Friday that he's headed to real estate startup Opendoor as COO.
  • Big Bossman: There also have been several reports that Kalanick himself could take a leave of absence. I'm hearing that it's unlikely, particularly given how barren the remaining C-suite is right now (the only idea sillier than Bill Gurley being named interim CEO is the idea of Arianna Huffington doing it). A big wildcard is that Kalanick has spent most (if not all) of the past two weeks in the LA area, caring for his injured father ― in the aftermath of the boating accident that tragically killed his mother.
  • Sound of silence: Hearing nothing yet on the fate of CTO Thuan Pham, who was actually accused of negligence in Fowler's original post.
  • Newbie: Uber will add Wan Ling Martello, a Nestle executive and Alibaba director, to its board, according to Bloomberg.
  • Fiduciaries: There has been a lot of Twitter posturing and schadenfreude over this mess, but the job of Uber's investor board members this past weekend was to preserve value ― not appease the critics or the apologists. For many VC and private equity firms, Uber is their single most lucrative investment (on paper) and LPs are counting on eventual liquidity.

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - World

Mexican President López Obrador tests positive for coronavirus

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, on Wednesday. Photo: Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced Sunday evening that he's tested positive for COVID-19.

Driving the news: López Obrador tweeted that he has mild symptoms and is receiving medical treatment. "As always, I am optimistic," he added. "We will all move forward."

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Sarah Huckabee Sanders to run for governor of Arkansas

Sarah Huckabee Sanders at FOX News' studios in New York City in 2019. Photo: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will announce Monday that she's running for governor of Arkansas.

The big picture: Sanders was touted as a contender after it was announced she was leaving the Trump administration in June 2019. Then-President Trump tweeted he hoped she would run for governor, adding "she would be fantastic." Sanders is "seen as leader in the polls" in the Republican state, notes the Washington Post's Josh Dawsey, who first reported the news.

Coronavirus has inflamed global inequality

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

History will likely remember the pandemic as the "first time since records began that inequality rose in virtually every country on earth at the same time." That's the verdict from Oxfam's inequality report covering the year 2020 — a terrible year that hit the poorest, hardest across the planet.

Why it matters: The world's poorest were already in a race against time, facing down an existential risk in the form of global climate change. The coronavirus pandemic could set global poverty reduction back as much as a full decade, according to the World Bank.