Mar 21, 2017

Uber will release its first diversity report this month

Jeff Chiu / AP

Uber, whose CEO has long resisted releasing company data on employee demographics, will release its first report by the end of the month, HR chief Liane Hornsey said on Tuesday during a conference call with reporters.

Hornsey, along with board member Arianna Huffington and regional manager Rachel Holt, reiterated past statements about the company's commitment to change, during the call, but offered few specifics. Huffington also continued to defend CEO Travis Kalanick.

Other highlights from the briefing:

  • It plans to complete its internal investigation, led by former attorney general Eric Holder, by the end of April. Huffington added that whatever those results are, they "will be honored by everyone at Uber."
  • Uber said its workforce doubled last year.
  • The board is in the midst of interviewing COO candidates and is pleased with quality of interested candidates, according to Huffington.
  • Last week, Uber had another record week in US ridership, continuing a trend Axios previously reported.

Gender imbalance: Several journalists pointed out that all executives on the call were women, while CEO Travis Kalanick and board member and investor Bill Gurley were busy with interviewing potential COO candidates. Hornsey and Huffington both said that they were also involved with the COO search.

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Police officer in George Floyd killing arrested

A protester with a sign with George Floyd's last words. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer involved in the killing of George Floyd, was taken into custody Friday by Minnesota's Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, according to the Star Tribune's Briana Bierschbach.

The state of play: Minnesota Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington said that there was no additional charging information yet, as that decision is in the jurisdiction of the Hennepin County Attorney's Office.

This is a breaking news story and will be updated.

Trump forces fateful choices on Twitter and Facebook

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Trump's war with Twitter is confronting social media platforms with a hard dilemma: whether to take fuller responsibility for what people say on their services, or to step back and assume a more quasi-governmental role.

The big picture: Facebook is trying to be more like a government committing to impartiality and protecting free speech and building mechanisms for arbitration. Twitter, pushed by Trump's inflammatory messages, is opting to more aggressively enforce conduct rules on its private property, like a mall owner enforcing rules inside the gates.

Updated 53 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 5,851,494 — Total deaths: 362,238 — Total recoveries — 2,445,181Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 1,729,185 — Total deaths: 101,706 — Total recoveries: 399,991 — Total tested: 15,646,041Map.
  3. 2020: North Carolina asks RNC if convention will honor Trump's wish for no masks or social distancing.
  4. Public health: Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March —How the U.S. might distribute a vaccine.
  5. Transportation: National mobility keeps rising as more states reopen economies.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Saying goodbye to U.S. megacities.