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Uber has used promises of good pay and flexible hours to attract drivers to its growing ride-hail service. Now, it says it is willing to spend millions to settle a lawsuit with a federal agency over allegations it exaggerated just how much people could make by driving for the ride-hail service.

The heart of the claims: The Federal Trade Commission says Uber offered inflated hourly earning figures for potential drivers. Uber doesn't admit or deny the activities alleged in the lawsuit.

  • The FTC alleges that the company used inflated figures in job advertisements. It says, for example, that fewer than 20% of drivers in Washington, D.C. earned the $21 per hour wage advertised by the company on Craigslist.
  • The FTC's suit says that drivers in the key markets of New York and San Francisco brought in substantially less than the yearly income mentioned in a company blog post for those cities.
  • The government also says Uber misrepresented the terms of leases it offered on vehicles.

What Uber's agreeing to: The company will pay $20 million and is forbidden from making certain misrepresentations or unsubstantiated claims in the future.

"We've made many improvements to the driver experience over the last year and will continue to focus on ensuring that Uber is the best option for anyone looking to earn money on their own schedule." — Uber spokesperson

Why this matters: The suit fits into a national debate over Uber's relationship with its workers, who are contractors and don't receive some of the protections often associated with traditional, full-time employment. The company says, however, that they've created an innovative way for people to earn money while working on their own schedule.

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The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

Trump gives Biden access to presidential intelligence briefings

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The Trump White House on Tuesday gave President-elect Biden access to daily presidential intelligence briefings, a source familiar with the matter tells Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has refused to share the briefs until now, as he continues to challenge the result of the election and declines to concede. The president's acquiescence comes as another sign that the transition to a Biden administration is taking place.

AOC and Ilhan Omar want to block Biden’s former chief of staff

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Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar are boosting a petition against Joe Biden nominating his former chief of staff to a new role in his administration, calling Bruce Reed a "deficit hawk” and criticizing his past support for Social Security and Medicare cuts.

Why it matters: Progressives are mounting their pressure campaign after the president-elect did not include any of their favored candidates in his first slate of Cabinet nominees, and they are serious about installing some of their allies, blocking anyone who doesn't pass their smell test — and making noise if they are not heard.