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Núcleo Editorial / Flickr cc

Last month, Uber sued Seattle, which is aimed at fighting the city's landmark law that allows its drivers to unionize, per The Verge. The law in Seattle, which passed in December 2015 in a 9-0 vote, is the only law of its kind and enables drivers of ride-sharing apps — like Uber and Lyft — the opportunity to bargain for better working conditions, earnings and benefits.

In its suit, Uber labeled the new rules — which didn't didn't kick in until January 17, 2017 — "arbitrary and capricious" and inconsistent with "fundamental labor lines."

The city of Seattle has since released a response, stating that it is confident the court will rule in favor of the city's authority to move forward with the law. A hearing for the lawsuit is scheduled for March 17th.

Go deeper

Updated 19 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Vaccines: Key information about the effective COVID-19 vaccines — Oxford and AstraZeneca's vaccine won't just go to rich countries.
  2. Health: U.S. coronavirus hospitalizations keep breaking recordsWhy we're numb to 250,000 deaths.
  3. World: England to impose stricter regional systemU.S. hotspots far outpacing Europe's — Portugal to ban domestic travel for national holidays.
  4. Economy: The biggest pandemic labor market drags.
  5. Sports: Coronavirus precautions leave college basketball schedule in flux.

Pennsylvania certifies Biden's victory

Photo: Aimee Dilger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Pennsylvania officials on Tuesday certified the state's presidential election results, making President-elect Joe Biden's win in the key battleground official.

Why it matters: The move deals another blow to President Trump's failed efforts to block certification in key swing states that he lost to Biden. It also comes one day after officials voted to certify Biden's victory in Michigan.

Trump bump: NYT and WaPo digital subscriptions tripled since 2016

Data: Axios reporting and public filings; Chart: Axios Visuals

The New York Times and The Washington Post have very different strategies for building the subscription news company of the future.

The big picture: Sources tell Axios that the Post is nearing 3 million digital subscribers, a 50% year-over-year growth in subscriptions and more than 3x the number of digital-only subscribers it had in 2016. The New York Times now has more than 6 million digital-only subscribers, nearly 3x its number from 2016.