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Núcleo Editorial / Flickr cc

Bloomberg's Eric Newcomer reports that "senior management and investors" at Uber are frustrated by the fact that they faced backlash over an affiliation with Donald Trump, while Elon Musk hasn't.

Hold up: Uber is forcefully pushing back on the report, calling it "not representative of how we feel." "No one working at Uber would want another company to experience what we have over the past few weeks," spokeswoman Jill Hazelbaker told Bloomberg.

It's complicated: Musk, the CEO of both Tesla and SpaceX, has indeed faced some criticism for his presence on two administration advisory councils. Some customers have said they are cancelling their orders for Teslas over that connection. But it's nowhere near the experience of Uber chief Travis Kalanick, who ended up quitting the council after users started deleting their Uber apps en masse. The vocal reaction may be due, in part, to the large reach of Uber's service with the urban set, who tend to skew younger and more left-of-center politically.

For his part, Musk has repeatedly defended his engagement with the administration, saying activists should be urging more moderate voices around the table with Trump.

The bigger picture: The backlash felt by tech companies working with Trump reached a new level after the administration's ban on travel from seven majority-Muslim countries. And there's little sign that it will let up anytime soon.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
15 mins ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.

Trump political team disavows "Patriot Party" groups

Marine One carries President Trump away from the White House on Inauguration Day. Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Donald Trump's still-active presidential campaign committee officially disavowed political groups affiliated with the nascent "Patriot Party" on Monday.

Why it matters: Trump briefly floated the possibility of creating a new political party to compete with the GOP — with him at the helm. But others have formed their own "Patriot Party" entities during the past week, and Trump's team wants to make clear it has nothing to do with them.