Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi. Photo: Mike Cohen/Getty Images for The New York Times

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said Monday in an email to employees that the company is cutting about 3,000 more jobs and closing or consolidating 45 offices to soften the economic blow from the coronavirus pandemic, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: Khosrowshahi's announcement comes just two weeks after the company said it would ax about 3,700 jobs and save more than $1 billion in fixed costs. Much of Uber's ride-hailing business has vanished as people stay indoors, even as the company's food delivery sector has seen a boom.

Go deeper: Democrats line up against possible Uber-Grubhub merger

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16 hours ago - Podcasts

The fight over the future of ridesharing

On Monday, a California superior court judge ruled that Uber and Lyft should classify drivers as employees, not temporary contractors. Both companies plan to appeal, and on Wednesday, Uber’s CEO said that the company would have to temporarily stop operating in California if the ruling is upheld.

Axios Re:Cap examines the legal battle and what comes next with the New York Times' Mike Isaac, author of “Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber.”

Updated 20 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Pelosi says Mnuchin told her White House is "not budging" on stimulus position

Democrats and the Trump administration remain "miles apart" on negotiations over a coronavirus stimulus deal, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said on Wednesday.

The latest: Around 3 p.m., Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) issued a statement saying that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin had initiated a phone call and made clear that the White House is "not budging from their position concerning the size and scope of a legislative package."

21 hours ago - Health

Florida sheriff bans employees from wearing masks

Sheriff woods. Photo: Gerardo Mora/Getty Images

Sheriff Billy Woods of Marion County, Fla., prohibited his employees from wearing masks at work on Tuesday, disputing — in spite of scientific evidence — that they help curb the spread of coronavirus, the Ocala Star-Banner reports.

Why it matters: Many large police departments only suggest officers wear masks, and some have faced public scrutiny for tenuous or nonexistent mask policies. But Woods is among the first law enforcement officials to outright ban masks for his department, according to the Washington Post.