Nov 21, 2019

Uber is testing ad displays for its cars

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Some Uber drivers have independently been putting ad displays on top of their cars, but now the ride-hailing company has teamed with startup Cargo for a small test of officially deploying ads to drivers in Atlanta.

Why it matters: This could be a new revenue source for Uber, which has been under heavy pressure to move towards profitability.

The details: Drivers who put the ads on their cars can make $40 for their first 20 hours of driving each week, with an extra $10 for every five additional hours, with a maximum of $150 per week. There's a $150 security deposit as well.

  • The displays are provided by Cargo, a New York-based startup and existing partner best known for its boxes of snacks and other items that ride-hailing drivers can sell to passengers for extra cash.
  • Like the snack boxes, the ad deal can help drivers make more money and offset some of their frustration with declining earnings.
  • "This is a very limited pilot, which we would look to expand only if successful," an Uber spokesperson told Axios.  

The intrigue: As part of Uber’s partnership with Cargo for these car tops, Uber, as well as Cargo, will get a cut of the advertising revenue, Axios has learned.

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Zipline drones deliver masks to hospitals; vaccines could be next

Zipline's drone drops medical supplies via parachute. Image courtesy of Zipline.

Zipline, a California drone company, has made its U.S. debut by delivering medical supplies to hospitals in North Carolina under a pilot program honed in Africa.

Why it matters: The effort, made possible by a waiver from the Federal Aviation Administration to Novant Health, is the nation's longest-range drone delivery operation and could demonstrate how drones could be used in future pandemics, Zipline officials said.

NHL unveils 24-team playoff plan to return from coronavirus hiatus

Data: NHL; Table: Axios Visuals

The NHL unveiled its return-to-play plan on Tuesday, formally announcing that 24 of its 31 teams will return for a playoff tournament in two hub cities, if and when medically cleared.

Why it matters: Hockey is the first major North American sports league to sketch out its plans to return from a coronavirus-driven hiatus in such detail, and it's also the first one to officially pull the plug on its regular season, which will trigger ticket refunds.

Rising home sales show Americans are looking past the coronavirus

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Americans are behaving very differently than they have in previous recessions — convinced that the coronavirus pandemic will soon pass, many continue to spend money as if nothing has changed.

Driving the news: The latest example of this trend is the Commerce Department's new home sales report, which showed home sales increased in April despite nationwide lockdowns that banned real estate agents in some states from even showing listed houses.