Nov 27, 2017

Uber banned in Israel

A rider waits for their Uber at LaGuardia Airport in New York. Photo: Seth Wenig / AP

An Israeli court has banned Uber from operating in the country less than a month after the company began offering 24/7 ride-sharing services there, per Haaretz and The Jerusalem Post. The ban comes as the result of a lawsuit by a taxi drivers' association with a judge agreeing that Uber drivers did not have the appropriate insurance to transport customers.

Why it matters: It's illustrative of Uber's growing pains within global legal and regulatory frameworks as it attempts to expand its reach around the world. To make matters worse in Israel, Uber still has a pending lawsuit against it from Israel's Transportation Ministry, claiming that it subverts an Israeli regulation that forbids drivers offering passengers a ride for a profit without a taxi license.

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Updates: George Floyd protests continue past curfews

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day — prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: Protesters were still out en masse even as curfews set in Washington, D.C., and New York City. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) slammed the New York Police Department late Tuesday following reports of police kettling in protesters on Manhattan Bridge.

Primary elections test impact of protests, coronavirus on voting

Election official at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

Iowa Rep. Steve King defeated in GOP primary

Rep. Steve King. Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

State Sen. Randy Feenstra defeated incumbent Rep. Steve King in Tuesday's Republican primary for Iowa's 4th congressional district, according to the Cook Political Report.

Why it matters: King's history of racist remarks has made him one of the most controversial politicians in the country and a pariah within the Republican Party.