Nov 27, 2019

Twitter pauses plan to delete inactive accounts

Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Twitter said Wednesday it was putting on hold a plan to delete inactive accounts amid concerns that accounts from deceased users would be swept up in the purge.

Why it matters: While it's great to see Twitter clearing out the accounts of living people who aren't using them, Twitter also represents an important record of those no longer here.

  • "We’ve heard you on the impact that this would have on the accounts of the deceased," Twitter said. "This was a miss on our part. We will not be removing any inactive accounts until we create a new way for people to memorialize accounts."

Twitter had said on Tuesday that it would delete the accounts next month of all those who hadn't logged in during the past six months. In its statement clarifying the policy, Twitter said it was only intended for the European Union, though it will continue to monitor laws around the world to ensure compliance.

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Twitter plans to purge inactive accounts

Photo: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Twitter is warning its inactive users — those who haven't logged on in over six months — that their accounts will be deleted unless they sign in by Dec. 11, The Verge first reported Tuesday.

Why it matters, via Axios' Ina Fried: By deleting accounts, Twitter could hurt its overall metrics as well as the follower counts of individual users. Dormant user names could also become available to people who want to make more frequent use of the service.

Go deeperArrowNov 27, 2019

Twitter will make it easier to identify political candidates

Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Twitter is launching two initiatives that will help users better identify political candidates on its platform, the company announced Thursday.

Why it matters: It's an effort to curb misinformation, making it easier for users to find original sources of information.

Go deeperArrowDec 12, 2019

Disney+ accounts hacked, likely due to password reuse


Photo: SOPA Images/Getty Images

Hacked Disney+ accounts showed up for sale on dark web criminal markets almost immediately after Disney's new streaming service went live, reported ZDNet.

The big picture: The hijacking of account credentials no doubt came as a shock to the affected users, who suddenly found their passwords changed and their accounts inaccessible. But it's a commonplace occurrence in a world where many users reuse passwords from one service to another.

Go deeperArrowNov 19, 2019