Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey. Photo: David Becker/Getty Images

No matter how much you've read about Twitter’s troubles, the platform is enjoying a burst of encouraging signs.

Driving the news: Twitter's Q1 numbers came in high today: 330 million monthly active users, 134 million visiting every day, and $787 million in revenue, beating analyst expectations.

Why it matters: When news happens, and when there's a major cultural event, Twitter is the second screen.

  • Twitter is building its key measurement around those spikes, focusing on daily active users, instead of monthly, and they're growing on that metric, particularly internationally.
  • But Twitter keeps getting criticized for brand safety during those spikes: Women and people of color face repeated harassment, fake news proliferates and the platform struggles to control propaganda and violence.

The big picture: Snapchat has more daily active users (186M). So does Instagram (500M for stories alone). And Facebook itself has 1.5 billion, The Verge notes.

  • That scale matters, especially for advertising.
  • It also matters for the future of Twitter. On the internet, at least, once you stop growing, you start shrinking.

Between the lines: "Twitter, which has a history of being slow to make changes to its service, has recently increased the pace of new product introductions," Bloomberg reports.

  • "Last month it opened access to its prototype app, called twttr, to test new ideas and get feedback."
  • "The company is also rolling out a Snapchat-like camera feature that lets users post videos or photos in a swipe."

P.S. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and President Trump met behind closed doors at the White House today, Motherboard first reported and a Twitter spokesperson confirmed.

"Jack had a constructive meeting with (POTUS) today at the president’s invitation. They discussed Twitter’s commitment to protecting the health of the public conversation ahead of the 2020 U.S. elections and efforts underway to respond to the opioid crisis."
— Twitter spokesperson

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President Trump added more pressure Friday night on China-based TikTok parent ByteDance to exit the U.S., ordering it to divest all assets related to the U.S. operation of TikTok within 90 days.

Between the lines: The order means ByteDance must be wholly disentangled from TikTok in the U.S. by November. Trump had previously ordered TikTok banned if ByteDance hadn't struck a deal within 45 days. The new order likely means ByteDance has just another 45 days after that to fully close the deal, one White House source told Axios.

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Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.