May 26, 2017

Turkish attack in D.C.: frame by frame

VOA

A remarkable interactive reconstruction from the N.Y. Times, "Did the Turkish President's Security Attack Protesters in Washington? What the Video Shows":

  • Labels for individual "Men in Dark Suits" include "Rushed, punched protesters" ... "Kicked, punched protesters" ... "Choked, slammed woman" ... "Kicked man in head" ... "Kicked man on ground" .... "Punched, kicked two protesters."
  • "Ten of the men who attacked protesters appear to be part of a formal security detail. They dressed in dark suits, and they wore in-ear radio receivers, Turkish breast pins and lanyards with identification cards. At least four of the men carried guns."
  • Why it matters: "Turkey's president, [Recep Tayyip] Erdogan, watched the brawl from a black Mercedes-Benz sedan parked nearby, at the Turkish ambassador's residence. ... [V]ideo ... shows that at least one member of the security detail positioned next to him rushed into the fight and started kicking and punching protesters."

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