Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Ted S. Warren / AP

The roof of a tunnel "caved in" at the Hanford nuclear site in Washington Tuesday morning, per Hanford spokesman Destry Henderson. Hundreds of workers were in the "take cover" position after the collapse, and facility personnel were evacuated, according to the Energy Department, which labeled the incident an emergency.

What happened: The tunnel that caved in was filled with radioactive trains that transported nuclear waste. A spokesperson for the Washington Department of Ecology said that there has been no detection of a radiation release, which Henderson confirmed Tuesday afternoon.

Why it matters: The Energy Department has acknowledged in 20 studies that there is a safety risk to the workers at Hanford; the site is where plutonium was produced for the Nagasaki Bomb and has been dubbed "the most toxic place in America" and "an underground Chernobyl waiting to happen" since it's the largest depository of radioactive defense waste.

What we know about the incident:

  • "There are concerns about subsidence in the soil covering railroad tunnels near a former chemical processing facility," per the Energy Department.
  • Employees were told to "secure ventilation" in their buildings and "refrain from eating or drinking," per KING Television.
  • Workers in affected areas have gone indoors, per the Energy Department.
  • Residents of Benton and Franklin Counties have not been required to take shelter, per the Energy Department.
  • Employees at nearby Vit Plant are also in the "take cover" mode, per KING Television.

Go deeper

44 mins ago - Health

Africa CDC: Vaccines likely won't be available until Q2 of 2021

Africa CDC director Dr. John Nkengasong. Photo: Mohammed Abdu Abdulbaqi/Anadolu Agency via Getty

Africa may have to wait until the second quarter of 2021 to roll out vaccines, Africa CDC director John Nkengasong said Thursday, according to the Associated Press.

Why it matters: “I have seen how Africa is neglected when drugs are available,” Nkengasong said.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

The winners and losers of the pandemic holiday season

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic has upended Thanksgiving and the shopping season that the holiday kicks off, creating a new crop of economic winners and losers.

The big picture: Just as it has exacerbated inequality in every other facet of American life, the coronavirus pandemic is deepening inequities in the business world, with the biggest and most powerful companies rapidly outpacing the smaller players.

Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

The daily rate of new coronavirus infections rose by about 10 percent in the final week before Thanksgiving, continuing a dismal trend that may get even worse in the weeks to come.

Why it matters: Travel and large holiday celebrations are most dangerous in places where the virus is spreading widely — and right now, that includes the entire U.S.