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Europe, China threaten retaliation over Trump's tariffs

President Donald Trump. Photo: Samuel Corum / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

Donald Trump's move on Thursday to push forward his tariffs on steel and aluminum imports has already prompted threats of retaliation.

Why it matters: While the tariffs aren't quite as drastic as originally believed, they're still facing backlash — even at home. Trump's decision met with immediate rebuke from high-profile Republicans and some U.S. manufacturers amid growing concern that a trade war could hurt the economy and risk thousands of jobs.

What they're saying:

  • French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire: "There are only losers in a trade war ... With our EU partners, we will assess consequences on our industries and agree (an) appropriate response."
  • EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström: "The EU is a close ally of the US and we continue to be of the view that the EU should be excluded from these measures. I will seek more clarity on this issue in days to come." She also suggested that the E.U. could impose tariffs on cranberries, orange juice and peanut butter, according to The Washington Post.
  • China Foreign Minister Wang Yi, per Reuters: “Especially given today’s globalization, choosing a trade war is a mistaken prescription. The outcome will only be harmful. China would have to make a justified and necessary response.”
Haley Britzky 7 hours ago
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DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the Times. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.

Haley Britzky 7 hours ago
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Media tycoon Barry Diller talks #MeToo

 IAC & Expedia, Inc. Chairman & Senior Executive Barry Diller
IAC & Expedia, Inc. Chairman & Senior Executive Barry Diller. Photo: Cindy Ord / Getty Images for Yahoo

Barry Diller, chairman of mega-media and Internet company IAC, told the New York Times he thinks "all men are guilty," when it comes to "the spectrum" of the #MeToo movement.

"I hope in the future for some form of reconciliation. Because I think all men are guilty. I’m not talking about rape and pillage. I’m not talking about Harveyesque. I’m talking about all of the spectrum. From an aggressive flirt. Or even just a flirty-flirt that has one sour note in it. Or what I think every man was guilty of, some form of omission in attitude, in his views."

Why it matters: The #MeToo movement has rocked Hollywood and the media industry. Diller told the Times he sees the effects of this "in our companies, where the relationships between people are changing."